Trump calls for 'intelligent background checks' in response to mass shootings

 
“Frankly, we need intelligent background checks,” Trump told reporters as he left the White House for a fundraiser in the Hamptons.
 
"This isn't a question of NRA, Republican or Democrat," he added.
 
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"I think with a lot of success that we have, I think I have a greater influence now over the Senate and over the House," he said. "I think we can get something really good done. I think we can have some meaningful background checks."
 
McConnell has not publicly backed any gun bills following mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, though he did note a background checks bill backed by Sens. Pat ToomeyPatrick (Pat) Joseph ToomeyBlack women look to build upon gains in coming elections Watch live: GOP senators present new infrastructure proposal Sasse rebuked by Nebraska Republican Party over impeachment vote MORE (R-Pa.) and Joe ManchinJoe ManchinOvernight Energy: Senate panel advances controversial public lands nominee | Nevada Democrat introduces bill requiring feds to develop fire management plan | NJ requiring public water systems to replace lead pipes in 10 years Transit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal Senate panel advances controversial public lands nominee in tie vote MORE (D-W.Va.) was once again getting attention.
 
That bill failed to get enough votes to move through the Senate after the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings.
 
Trump previously voiced support for stronger background checks and an increase in the age requirement to purchase certain types of weapons following the 2018 shooting at a Parkland, Fla., high school. But he backed off amid opposition from the National Rifle Association (NRA).

The president said Friday that he believes there's stronger support for the issue now than following the Parkland massacre.
 
“I see a better feeling right now toward getting something meaningful done," Trump said. 

"And we did do things after Parkland," he added. "But it wasn’t to the same level that I’m talking about now."

In the wake of weekend shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio, that left more than 30 dead, Trump has expressed support for background checks and "red flag" laws that would allow law enforcement to obtain court orders to confiscate weapons from dangerous individuals.

But the NRA has opposed proposals for stricter background checks and “red flag” laws, which would seek to keep guns away from people flagged as possibly dangerous.

Trump downplayed any opposition from gun rights lobby on Friday.

“I have a great relationship with the NRA,” he said. "They supported me very early and that's been a great decision they made."
 
—Updated at 11:19 a.m.