Trump says it would be 'disloyal to my followers' to do a CNN interview

President TrumpDonald John TrumpAlaska Republican Party cancels 2020 primary Ukrainian official denies Trump pressured president Trump goes after New York Times, Washington Post: 'They have gone totally CRAZY!!!!' MORE on Thursday said he's not inclined to do an interview with CNN because he thinks it would be "disloyal" to his supporters.

"They are begging me to do an interview, and I just think it would be disloyal to my followers," Trump said after he called into Brian Kilmeade's Fox News Radio show.

"I think it would be very disloyal to people that are Trump fans and people that voted for me and people that are going to vote again," he added.

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Trump has not sat for an interview with CNN since he took office, though he spoke with the network multiple times during his 2016 presidential campaign.

The president, who has long feuded with the network and other major media outlets over their coverage of his administration, slammed CNN and MSNBC at length on Thursday.

He complained that the networks and other outlets are "despicable people" and targeted MSNBC's Lawrence O'Donnell over a report he retracted the previous night.

Trump called into Kilmeade's show one day after he lambasted Fox News and complained the network "isn't working for us anymore."

"Fox News isn’t supposed to work for you," Fox News senior political analyst Brit Hume responded on Twitter.

Trump told Kilmeade that he's "not happy with Fox" before listing off a number of opinion hosts still in his good graces.

"People think Fox is for me. Look, Sean [Hannity], and Laura [Ingraham] and Tucker [Carlson] has really been very good — well, Tucker’s a little tricky, but that’s OK," Trump said with a laugh.

The president again complained that Fox News polls show him struggling against Democratic candidates in hypothetical 2020 match-ups.

Trump regularly dismisses coverage that is unfavorable as "fake news" and has decried certain outlets as the "enemy of the people" despite warnings from free press advocates about the dangers of the terms.