Trump admin to provide name of Saudi official allegedly involved in 9/11 terror attacks

The Trump administration agreed to reveal the identity of one official in Saudi Arabia accused of being involved in the 9/11 terrorist attacks following a lobbying campaign by victims’ families.

The families urged the administration for months to publicize information regarding suspected Saudi involvement in the attacks, sending a letter to President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham to introduce resolution condemning House impeachment inquiry Support for impeachment inches up in poll Fox News's Bret Baier calls Trump's attacks on media 'a problem' MORE recently that said it would help them “finally learn the full truth and obtain justice from Saudi Arabia.”

The FBI, noting to The Hill the “exceptional nature of the case,” agreed to provide the name of one Saudi official the group had most wanted but declined to release any other details at this time.

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The families were seeking information from the government as part of a lawsuit against Saudi Arabia that alleges Riyadh helped coordinate the 2001 attacks that killed nearly 3,000 in Manhattan, the Pentagon and Pennsylvania. 

Sean Carter, one of the lead lawyers for the plaintiffs, confirmed to The Hill the disclosure was made following a subpoena served to the FBI as part of the suit. 

While most of the attackers were from Saudi Arabia, the government there has denied any complicity in the attacks.

The 9/11 Families & Survivors United for Justice Against Terrorism applauded the administration’s decision.

“This is a good result,” said Terry Strada, National Chairwoman of the 9/11 Families & Survivors United for Justice Against Terrorism. “The families are dedicated to getting to the truth, and we shouldn’t have to beg for this sort of basic information, or be kept in the dark, about the Saudi role in the attacks.”

“The Saudis are running out of rope,” added Carter and Don Migliori, another attorney for the 9/11 Families & Survivors United for Justice Against Terrorism, whose members are suing Saudi Arabia. “It was always clear that this information was not a ‘state secret’ and we’re pleased that the Attorney General agreed. We look forward to more disclosures in the weeks and months ahead.” 

Neither the FBI nor the Justice Department immediately responded to requests for comment from The Hill. 

The families had subpoenaed an unredacted copy of a 2012 summary of an FBI probe into three people who are accused of assisting two hijackers in California obtain housing and driver’s licenses, among other things. Two of the people were identified as Fahad al-Thumairy and Omar al-Bayoumi, according to the Journal. A third person, whose name is redacted, is believed by the families to have ties to Riyadh and have ordered the others to aid the hijackers.

The FBI told The Hill it may make further disclosures related to the subpoena.