Trump called out for 'my favorite dictator' while awaiting Egyptian leader at summit: report

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's newest Russia adviser, Andrew Peek, leaves post: report Hawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Trump rips New York City sea wall: 'Costly, foolish' and 'environmentally unfriendly idea' MORE, while awaiting a meeting with Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi during the Group of Seven (G7) summit, called for “my favorite dictator,” The Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

“Where’s my favorite dictator?” Trump said as at a hotel in Biarritz, France, where the two were reportedly set to meet last month. A group of at least 10 U.S. and three Egyptian officials was reportedly awaiting Sisi’s arrival.

Several American and Egyptian officials who were in the same room as Trump overheard his remark, the Journal reported. It isn’t clear if Sisi was there or if he heard the comment.

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Many said they thought Trump was making a joke, but the comment reportedly prompted silence from the group.

Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinSecurity for Trump's Mar-a-Lago visits cost local taxpayers million On The Money — Presented by Wells Fargo — Senate approves Trump trade deal with Canada, Mexico | Senate Dems launch probe into Trump tax law regulations | Trump announces Fed nominees Senate Democrats launch investigation into Trump tax law regulations MORE, former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonDemocrats file brief against Trump, 'the Framers' worst nightmare' Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers gear up for Senate impeachment trial Pelosi offers message to Trump on Bill Maher show: 'You are impeached forever' MORE and Larry KudlowLawrence (Larry) Alan KudlowMORE, assistant to the president for economic policy, were in attendance, the Journal reported.

Egypt’s foreign affairs minister and chief of the General Intelligence Service were also said to be present.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill.

Since taking power in 2013, Sisi has come under fire for his authoritarian leadership and has faced accusations of detaining, torturing and killing prisoners who disagreed politically, the Journal noted.

Trump has previously said of Sisi: “We understood each other very well. He’s a very tough man, I will tell you that. But he’s also a good man, and he’s done a fantastic job in Egypt. Not easy.”