Bolton returns to political group after exiting administration

Bolton returns to political group after exiting administration
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Former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonJudge lifts restraining order on Mary Trump on eve of book's release The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - All eyes on Florida as daily COVID-19 cases hit 15K Juan Williams: Trump's silence on Russian bounties betrays America MORE Saturday announced he would resume the John Bolton PAC and John Bolton Super PAC, his first political moves since he was fired from the White House.

In its first move, Bolton’s PAC will endorse and donate $10,000 each to Sens. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonWells Fargo told employees to delete TikTok from work phones Public letter in Harper's sparks furor Koch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads MORE (R-Ark.), Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - All eyes on Florida as daily COVID-19 cases hit 15K Democrats seek to tie GOP candidates to Trump, DeVos Senate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick MORE (R-Colo.) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisConservative group launches ad campaign for Rep. Roger Marshall in Kansas Senate race The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - All eyes on Florida as daily COVID-19 cases hit 15K Democrats seek to tie GOP candidates to Trump, DeVos MORE (R-N.C.) and Reps. Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerPentagon: 'No corroborating evidence' yet to validate troop bounty allegations Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police Trump faces bipartisan calls for answers on Russian-offered bounties MORE (R-Ill.) and Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinCongress pulls punches on Russian bounties firestorm US lawmakers call on EU to label entire Hezbollah a terrorist organization Democrats release bilingual ads on police reform bill MORE (R-N.Y.).

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“The John Bolton PAC and John Bolton Super PAC seek a strong, clear, and dependable U.S. national security policy, resting on constancy and resolve,” Bolton, a foreign policy hawk, said in a statement. “The experience that these incumbent members of Congress have provides them with a remarkable understanding and knowledge of the threats we face from international terrorism and rogue regimes such as Iran and North Korea.” 

President TrumpDonald John TrumpWayfair refutes QAnon-like conspiracy theory that it's trafficking children Stone rails against US justice system in first TV interview since Trump commuted his sentence Federal appeals court rules Trump admin can't withhold federal grants from California sanctuary cities MORE fired Bolton this week, saying his "services are no longer needed at the White House."

Trump cited strong disagreements “with many of his suggestions.” Bolton rejected the idea that he was dismissed, maintaining that he resigned. 

Trump and Bolton were known to have clashed on an array of foreign policy issues, most notably over the president’s openness to meeting with Iranian leaders. 

Despite Trump’s sway over the GOP, Republicans on Capitol Hill expressed dismay at Bolton’s ouster, signaling his firing may not have made him persona non grata within the GOP. 

“His view was not always the same as everybody else in the room. That’s why you wanted him there. The fact that he was a contrarian from time to time is an asset, not a liability,” Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyJudge seeks copy of order commuting Roger Stone sentence Top Mueller prosecutor: 'We could have done more' in Russia investigation Chris Christie: I wouldn't have commuted Roger Stone sentence MORE (R-Utah) told reporters Tuesday. “I’m very, very unhappy to hear that he’s leaving. It is a huge loss for the administration in my opinion and for the nation.”