Two former Trump aides ordered to defy House subpoenas

The White House has ordered two former aides to President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump goes after Cassidy after saying he wouldn't support him for president in 2024 Jan. 6 panel lays out criminal contempt case against Bannon Hillicon Valley — Presented by Xerox — Agencies sound alarm over ransomware targeting agriculture groups MORE to defy their subpoenas to appear at a House Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday. 

White House counsel Pat Cipollone said in a letter to the panel that the Justice Department recommended and Trump directed Rick Dearborn and Rob Porter to go against their subpoenas due to "constitutional immunity."  

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The letter said the two were told not to go “because of the constitutional immunity that protects senior advisers to the president from compelled congressional testimony, and in order to protect the prerogatives of the Office of President."

Democrats are legally objecting to the ability to declare "absolute immunity" in a suit against former White House counsel Don McGahn.

The only expected witness for Tuesday's hearing now is former Trump campaign manager Corey LewandowskiCorey LewandowskiNew Trump super PAC formed after accusations of misconduct The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Alibaba - Democrats still at odds over Biden agenda Noem severs ties with Lewandowski after harassment allegations surface MORE. Cipollone instructed Lewandowski in another letter that he should not disclose private conversations with the president beyond what is public from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerSenate Democrats urge Garland not to fight court order to release Trump obstruction memo Why a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel MORE's report, The Associated Press reported. 

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerMore than 200 women, transgender inmates to be transferred from Rikers Island Alabama using COVID funds to build new prisons — is that Biden's vision? Alabama clears plan to use COVID-19 relief funds to build prisons MORE (D-N.Y.) subpoenaed all three to discuss what was reported by Mueller and to investigate whether Trump should be impeached. 

Nadler said in a statement Monday night that the White House's directions are a "shocking and dangerous assertion."

“The President would have us believe that he can willfully engage in criminal activity and prevent witnesses from testifying before Congress — even if they did not actually work for him or his administration,” Nadler said.