Two former Trump aides ordered to defy House subpoenas

The White House has ordered two former aides to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump says he doesn't want NYT in the White House Veterans group backs lawsuits to halt Trump's use of military funding for border wall Schiff punches back after GOP censure resolution fails MORE to defy their subpoenas to appear at a House Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday. 

White House counsel Pat Cipollone said in a letter to the panel that the Justice Department recommended and Trump directed Rick Dearborn and Rob Porter to go against their subpoenas due to "constitutional immunity."  

ADVERTISEMENT

The letter said the two were told not to go “because of the constitutional immunity that protects senior advisers to the president from compelled congressional testimony, and in order to protect the prerogatives of the Office of President."

Democrats are legally objecting to the ability to declare "absolute immunity" in a suit against former White House counsel Don McGahn.

The only expected witness for Tuesday's hearing now is former Trump campaign manager Corey LewandowskiCorey R. LewandowskiLewandowski told by Fox Business host he was being 'a little slurry' during interview The Hill's Morning Report - New impeachment battle: Pompeo vs. House Dems Lewandowski: 'Fair' to say Senate run might not happen MORE. Cipollone instructed Lewandowski in another letter that he should not disclose private conversations with the president beyond what is public from former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE's report, The Associated Press reported. 

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerDem committee chairs blast Trump G-7 announcement Top Democrat holds moment of silence for Cummings at hearing Barr to speak at Notre Dame law school on Friday MORE (D-N.Y.) subpoenaed all three to discuss what was reported by Mueller and to investigate whether Trump should be impeached. 

Nadler said in a statement Monday night that the White House's directions are a "shocking and dangerous assertion."

“The President would have us believe that he can willfully engage in criminal activity and prevent witnesses from testifying before Congress — even if they did not actually work for him or his administration,” Nadler said.