Lewandowski says he's open to role defending Trump against impeachment

Lewandowski says he's open to role defending Trump against impeachment
© Greg Nash

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump fires intelligence community inspector general who flagged Ukraine whistleblower complaint Trump organization has laid off over 1000 employees due to pandemic: report Trump invokes Defense Production Act to prevent export of surgical masks, gloves MORE's former campaign manager Corey LewandowskiCorey R. LewandowskiHillicon Valley — Presented by Facebook — FCC fines mobile carriers 0M for selling user data | Twitter verified fake 2020 candidate | Dems press DHS to complete election security report | Reddit chief calls TikTok spyware Rod Blagojevich joins app where people can pay for personalized video message The Hill's Morning Report - Sanders repeats with NH primary win, but with narrower victory MORE indicated Thursday that he would be willing to take on a role to aid Trump in the impeachment fight with House Democrats, but said he has not had formal conversations with the White House about the job. 

In an interview with The Hill, Lewandowski pushed back on a CNN report that he was set to attend a White House meeting later Thursday about the position.

“I have had no conversations with anyone in the White House about joining the team,” Lewandowski said.

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But he added that he “will help in any capacity I can to push back on a false narrative about impeachment.”

“I will do anything I can to support the president in the capacity that I’m allowed to do,” Lewandowski said.

CNN reported that Lewandowski was in talks about a crisis management type role within the administration where he would take the lead on messaging during an impeachment fight.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump says he opposes mail-in voting for November On The Money: Economy sheds 701K jobs in March | Why unemployment checks could take weeks | Confusion surrounds 9B in small-business loans The bipartisan neutering of the Congressional Budget Office MORE (D-Calif.) on Tuesday announced the House would launch a formal impeachment inquiry into Trump. The announcement came amid a growing furor over Trump’s conduct on a call with the president of Ukraine.

A readout of the July 25 call and whistleblower report on the call released in the past 48 hours illustrated how Trump urged the Ukrainian leader to “look into” Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden struggles to stay in the spotlight Is Texas learning to love ObamaCare? Romney warns Trump: Don't interfere with coronavirus relief oversight MORE and how the White House broke with normal procedures in storing the contents of the call.

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Lewandowski, who is considering a Senate run in New Hampshire, has been a fierce Trump loyalist dating back to his time working on the 2016 campaign. He has remained steadfastly committed to the president, attracting scrutiny in the process. 

He was named in former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE’s report earlier this year in an episode where Trump asked him to relay a message to then-Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Guidance on masks is coming The Hill's Campaign Report: Coronavirus forces Democrats to postpone convention Roy Moore to advise Louisiana pastor arrested for allegedly defying ban on large gatherings MORE that Sessions should curtail Mueller’s investigation.

Leandowski appeared before the House Judiciary Committee earlier this month in a combative hearing that quickly descended into chaos when the former campaign manager decried Democratic efforts to investigate the president.

Lewandowski later admitted to having lied to the press about his discussions with Trump, telling the panel that he felt “no obligation to have a candid conversation with the media.”