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El Salvador president: 'Nobody cares' about US impeachment inquiry

El Salvador President Nayib Bukele dismissed the U.S. political storm over a whistleblower report alleging President TrumpDonald John TrumpVenezuela judge orders prison time for 6 American oil executives Trump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation MORE tried to persuade Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump says he'll leave White House if Biden declared winner of Electoral College The Memo: Biden faces tough road on pledge to heal nation US records 2,300 COVID-19 deaths as pandemic rises with holidays MORE, saying "nobody cares" about it.

"You're wasting airtime talking about something that nobody cares about," Bukele told Fox News's Martha MacCallum in an interview, after first saying he did not want to get into U.S. politics.

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Bukele, however, noted he would be more careful about his conversations with President Trump when asked by MacCallum about whether he would be worried that any talk would be released to the public.

"Now I'll be more careful," he said.

House Democrats have launched a formal impeachment inquiry over allegations surrounding Trump's talk with Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky, which were detailed in a whistleblower complaint.

Bukele also addressed the asylum agreement that El Salvador and the United States signed late last week to expand its capacity to accept asylum-seekers. 

Bukele stated that the onus of asylum should not fall entirely on the shoulders of the U.S.

"We have a problem that we need to fix," Bukele said. "In El Salvador, we have been sending migrants to the United States and elsewhere since the '80s."

Critics of the agreement spearheaded by Trump have cited El Salvador's high murder rate and proliferation of gang violence.

Bukele addressed these issues, claiming that he's decreased the murder rate "60 percent" by fighting the gangs "head-on." He believes that El Salvadorans' dreams "can come true at home," without having to migrate to countries like the U.S.