Bolton opposed Trump's Ukraine call: report

Former White House national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonHave the courage to recognize Taiwan McConnell says Obama administration 'did leave behind' pandemic plan Trump company lawyer warned Michael Cohen not to write 'tell-all' book: report MORE opposed the phone call between President TrumpDonald John TrumpMulvaney: 'We've overreacted a little bit' to coronavirus Former CBS News president: Most major cable news outlets 'unrelentingly liberal' in 'fear and loathing' of Trump An old man like me should be made more vulnerable to death by COVID-19 MORE and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky at the center of an impeachment inquiry launched by House Democrats, NBC News reported Monday.

Three current and former administration officials told the network that Bolton was opposed to the call because he was concerned Trump wasn’t coordinating with advisers on what to say and might air personal grievances.

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Officials reportedly noted that Bolton did not listen in on the call.

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment.

In the conversation on July 25, Trump pressed Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Americans debate life under COVID-19 risks Biden set to make risky economic argument against Trump Hillicon Valley: Tech companies lead way on WFH forever | States and counties plead for cybersecurity assistance | Trump weighing anti-conservative bias panel MORE and his son Hunter Biden.

A partial transcript of the call released by the White House last week confirmed the request from Trump.

The call gained attention following reports of a whistleblower complaint from within the intelligence community that focused on it.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBottom line This week: Surveillance fight sets early test for House's proxy voting Women suffering steeper job losses in COVID-19 economy MORE (D-Calif.) formally launched an impeachment inquiry last Tuesday and committee chairs have already begun requesting related documents.

Bolton was ousted as national security adviser last month amid policy disagreement with Trump.

In his first public speech since leaving the administration, he said on Monday that he does not believe North Korean leader Kim Jong UnKim Jong UnKim Jong Un seeks to continue bolstering North Korea's nuclear capabilities, state media says Overnight Defense: State Dept. watchdog was investigating emergency Saudi arms sales before ouster | Pompeo says he requested watchdog be fired for 'undermining' department | Pensacola naval base shooter had 'significant ties' to al Qaeda, Barr says Trump says investigation into Pompeo shows 'screwed up' priorities MORE will give up his nuclear weapons in a deal with the United States, contradicting Trump's position on the issue.