Bolton opposed Trump's Ukraine call: report

Former White House national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonTrump allies throw jabs at Bolton over book's claims GOP confident of win on witnesses Giuliani calls Bolton a 'backstabber' over Ukraine allegations MORE opposed the phone call between President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Don Lemon explains handling of segment after Trump criticism NPR reporter after Pompeo clash: Journalists don't interview government officials to score 'political points' Lawyer says Parnas can't attend Senate trial due to ankle bracelet MORE and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky at the center of an impeachment inquiry launched by House Democrats, NBC News reported Monday.

Three current and former administration officials told the network that Bolton was opposed to the call because he was concerned Trump wasn’t coordinating with advisers on what to say and might air personal grievances.

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Officials reportedly noted that Bolton did not listen in on the call.

The Hill has reached out to the White House for comment.

In the conversation on July 25, Trump pressed Zelensky to investigate former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPerry delegation talking points stressed pushing Ukraine to deal with 'corruption' GOP senator airs anti-Biden ad in Iowa amid impeachment trial Biden photobombs live national news broadcast at one of his rallies MORE and his son Hunter Biden.

A partial transcript of the call released by the White House last week confirmed the request from Trump.

The call gained attention following reports of a whistleblower complaint from within the intelligence community that focused on it.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats offer mixed reactions to Trump's Mideast peace plan James Taylor to perform at awards ceremony for Ruth Bader Ginsburg this week Trump offers two-state peace plan for Israeli-Palestinian conflict amid skepticism MORE (D-Calif.) formally launched an impeachment inquiry last Tuesday and committee chairs have already begun requesting related documents.

Bolton was ousted as national security adviser last month amid policy disagreement with Trump.

In his first public speech since leaving the administration, he said on Monday that he does not believe North Korean leader Kim Jong UnKim Jong UnPentagon official: 'We don't fully know the reasons' North Korea didn't fire 'Christmas gift' Activity seen at North Korean missile research center: report South Korea and the billion mustache MORE will give up his nuclear weapons in a deal with the United States, contradicting Trump's position on the issue.