Pentagon space agency to request $10.6 billion over five years: report

Pentagon space agency to request $10.6 billion over five years: report
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The Pentagon has requested nearly $11 billion in funding for a new space agency over the next five years.

According to Bloomberg, the money would go to the Space Development Agency, an organization created in March — and separate from the new Space Command — aimed to quickly create a constellation of as many as 1,200 satellites.

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The satellites would reportedly create a system called the National Defense Space Architecture. Ideally, the satellites would orbit the Earth at low altitudes, monitoring and sending data for identifying hypersonic weapons from China or Russia.

Documents obtained by Bloomberg show the proposed budget earmarks $259 million for fiscal 2021, $1.1 billion in 2022, $1.9 billion in 2023, $3.67 billion in 2024 and $3.68 billion in 2025.

The agency itself met opposition from the Air Force at its inception and the proposed budget is expected to receive similar scrutiny from members of Congress.

Rep. Adam SmithDavid (Adam) Adam SmithOvernight Defense: House passes compromise defense bill | Turkey sanctions advance in Senate over Trump objections | Top general says military won't be 'raping, burning and pillaging' after Trump pardons House passes defense bill to establish Space Force, paid family leave for federal workers Pentagon leaders: Trump clemencies won't affect military order and discipline MORE (D-Wash.) and Rep. Mac ThornberryWilliam (Mac) McClellan ThornberryConservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' House passes defense bill to establish Space Force, paid family leave for federal workers The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by AdvaMed - Democrats to release articles of impeachment today MORE (R-Texas), both on the House Armed Services Committee, wrote a letter on July 3 citing the departure of the agency's first director and “apparent change of direction” in the agency.

Jennifer Elzea, spokeswoman for the agency, told Bloomberg in a statement that the agency's goal was “capitalizing on commercial space developments in small satellites and making slight alterations for military systems.”