Gowdy in talks to join Trump's impeachment defense team

Former Rep. Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyMore than two dozen former prosecutors, judges, active trial lawyers support DOJ decision to dismiss Michael Flynn case Sunday shows preview: As states loosen social distancing restrictions, lawmakers address dwindling state budgets John Ratcliffe is the right choice for director of national intelligence — and for America MORE (R-S.C.) is in talks to join President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump second-term plans remain a mystery to GOP Trump to hold outdoor rally in New Hampshire on Saturday Eighty-eight years of debt pieties MORE's legal team as the president mounts a defense against an impeachment inquiry from House Democrats.

"We are in discussion with Trey about joining our team," Trump attorney Jay SekulowJay Alan SekulowAppeals court rejects Trump effort to throw out emoluments case Supreme Court divided over fight for Trump's financial records   Meadows joins White House in crisis mode MORE said, adding that no final decisions have been made.

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The White House did not respond to a request for comment.

A Fox News spokesperson said Wednesday that Gowdy has been terminated from his role with the network and is no longer a contributor.

Reports first surfaced late Tuesday afternoon that Gowdy was in talks to join the president's impeachment defense team. Conflicting reports later emerged about whether he had formally agreed to take on an outside role or if discussions were ongoing.

Gowdy, a former prosecutor who retired from Congress after his term ended in January, would bring an extensive knowledge of both the legal system and the inner workings of House proceedings.

He served as the chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee and led the House Select Committee on Benghazi, where he grilled former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSusan Rice sees stock rise in Biden VP race Democrats try to turn now into November The Memo: Unhappy voters could deliver political shocks beyond Trump MORE and other Obama administration officials over their roles and knowledge of the 2012 attack on the U.S. Consulate in the eastern Libyan city.

The White House on Tuesday evening escalated the fight with House Democrats over their impeachment inquiry.

White House counsel Pat Cipollone sent a letter to Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiRussian bounties revive Trump-GOP foreign policy divide On The Money: Breaking down the June jobs report | The biggest threats facing the recovery | What will the next stimulus bill include? Military bases should not be renamed, we must move forward in the spirit of reconciliation MORE (D-Calif.) and three committee leaders stating that the administration would not cooperate with any of their requests related to the impeachment inquiry.

The White House decried the inquiry as an "invalid" effort to "overturn the results of the 2016 election" and asserted that the lack of a formal vote to launch an impeachment inquiry broke with past precedent and violated the executive branch's rights.

Pelosi announced late last month that the House would formally launch an impeachment inquiry into Trump, alleging he abused his office by urging Ukraine's president to “look into” Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump second-term plans remain a mystery to GOP Susan Rice: Trump picks Putin over troops 'even when it comes to the blood of American service members' Does Donald Trump even want a second term? MORE.

Democratic committee leaders have in recent days issued subpoenas demanding records from the White House, Vice President Pence, the Office of Management and Budget, the Pentagon and Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiOusted Manhattan US Attorney Berman to testify before House next week Sunday shows preview: With coronavirus cases surging, lawmakers and health officials weigh in Hillicon Valley: Democrats introduce bill banning federal government use of facial recognition tech | House lawmakers roll out legislation to establish national cyber director | Top federal IT official to step down MORE as part of the investigation.

Updated Oct. 9 at 12:47 p.m.