Trey Gowdy joins Trump's legal team

Former Rep. Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdyTrey Gowdy returns to Fox News as contributor Five landmark moments of testimony to Congress Conway spars with Wallace on whether White House will cooperate with impeachment inquiry after formal vote MORE (R-S.C.) has officially joined President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats ask if they have reason to worry about UK result Trump scramble to rack up accomplishments gives conservatives heartburn Seven years after Sandy Hook, the politics of guns has changed MORE's outside legal defense team as the president gears up for an impeachment battle with the House.

Trump's personal attorney, Jay SekulowJay Alan SekulowSupreme Court takes up fight over Trump financial records Meadows says he's advocating for Trump to add Alan Dershowitz to impeachment defense team On The Money: Stocks tumble on Trump China trade remarks | Trump says deal could come after 2020 | Why Wall Street freaked | Trump loses appeal over Deutsche Bank subpoena MORE, confirmed in a statement Wednesday night that Gowdy would serve as counsel to the president.

"I have known Trey for years and worked with him when he served in Congress. His legal skills and his advocacy will serve the President well," Sekulow said. "Trey’s command of the law is well known and his service on Capitol Hill will be a great asset as a member of our team.”

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Sekulow had said Tuesday that Gowdy was in talks to join the president's legal team.

Gowdy is a career prosecutor who served four terms in Congress. He retired in January at the conclusion of his final term and joined Fox News as a contributor. Fox News cut ties with Gowdy on Wednesday ahead of Sekulow's announcement.

He previously served as the chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee and led the House Select Committee on Benghazi, where he grilled former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonMore than 200,000 Wisconsin voters will be removed from the rolls Trump is threatening to boycott the debates — here's how to make sure he shows up Trey Gowdy returns to Fox News as contributor MORE and other Obama administration officials over their roles and knowledge of the 2012 attack on the U.S. Consulate in the eastern Libyan city.

Gowdy's insistence on administrative compliance with congressional investigations while serving in the House is at odds with the White House's most recent approach to the impeachment inquiry.

White House counsel Pat Cipollone sent a letter to Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump scramble to rack up accomplishments gives conservatives heartburn Sherrod Brown backs new North American trade deal: 'This will be the first trade agreement I've ever voted for' Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Turf war derails push on surprise medical bills | Bill would tax e-cigarettes to pay for anti-vaping campaign | .5M ad blitz backs vulnerable Dems on drug prices MORE (D-Calif.) and three committee leaders on Tuesday stating that the administration would not cooperate with any of their requests related to the impeachment inquiry.

Pelosi announced late last month that the House would formally launch an impeachment inquiry into Trump, alleging he abused his office by urging Ukraine's president to “look into” Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenDemocrats ask if they have reason to worry about UK result Media organization fights Trump administration over Ukraine documents FOIA Buttigieg releases list of campaign bundlers MORE.

Democratic committee leaders have in recent days issued subpoenas demanding records from the White House, Vice President Pence, the Office of Management and Budget, the Pentagon and Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiDOJ releases memos backing Trump immunity claims ahead of impeachment vote Giuliani to Trump after Ukraine trip: I got 'more than you can imagine' Conservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' MORE as part of the investigation.

Trump said Wednesday that he would consider cooperating with the impeachment inquiry if the House formally voted to approve rules for the investigation and if those rules were "fair."