Trey Gowdy joins Trump's legal team

Former Rep. Trey GowdyTrey GowdyTrey Gowdy sets goal of avoiding ideological echo chamber with Fox News show Fox News signs Trey Gowdy, Dan Bongino for new shows Pompeo rebukes Biden's new foreign policy MORE (R-S.C.) has officially joined President TrumpDonald TrumpPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe Has Trump beaten the system? MORE's outside legal defense team as the president gears up for an impeachment battle with the House.

Trump's personal attorney, Jay SekulowJay Alan SekulowThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by TikTok - New video of riot unnerves many senators Trump legal switch hints at larger problems Trump, House GOP relationship suddenly deteriorates MORE, confirmed in a statement Wednesday night that Gowdy would serve as counsel to the president.

"I have known Trey for years and worked with him when he served in Congress. His legal skills and his advocacy will serve the President well," Sekulow said. "Trey’s command of the law is well known and his service on Capitol Hill will be a great asset as a member of our team.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Sekulow had said Tuesday that Gowdy was in talks to join the president's legal team.

Gowdy is a career prosecutor who served four terms in Congress. He retired in January at the conclusion of his final term and joined Fox News as a contributor. Fox News cut ties with Gowdy on Wednesday ahead of Sekulow's announcement.

He previously served as the chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee and led the House Select Committee on Benghazi, where he grilled former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe Shontel Brown gaining ground against Nina Turner in Ohio: poll Biden hits trail for McAuliffe in test of his political brand MORE and other Obama administration officials over their roles and knowledge of the 2012 attack on the U.S. Consulate in the eastern Libyan city.

Gowdy's insistence on administrative compliance with congressional investigations while serving in the House is at odds with the White House's most recent approach to the impeachment inquiry.

White House counsel Pat Cipollone sent a letter to Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiYellen to Congress: Raise the debt ceiling or risk 'irreparable harm' Freedom Caucus presses McCarthy to force vote to oust Pelosi The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Goldman Sachs - Tokyo Olympics kick off with 2020-style opening ceremony MORE (D-Calif.) and three committee leaders on Tuesday stating that the administration would not cooperate with any of their requests related to the impeachment inquiry.

Pelosi announced late last month that the House would formally launch an impeachment inquiry into Trump, alleging he abused his office by urging Ukraine's president to “look into” Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden authorizes up to 0M for Afghan refugees Poll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Biden flexes presidential muscle on campaign trail with Virginia's McAuliffe MORE.

Democratic committee leaders have in recent days issued subpoenas demanding records from the White House, Vice President Pence, the Office of Management and Budget, the Pentagon and Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiBob Dole: 'I'm a Trumper' but 'I'm sort of Trumped out' Ex-Trump adviser Barrack charged with secretly lobbying for UAE Aides who clashed with Giuliani intentionally gave him wrong time for Trump debate prep: book MORE as part of the investigation.

Trump said Wednesday that he would consider cooperating with the impeachment inquiry if the House formally voted to approve rules for the investigation and if those rules were "fair."