Trey Gowdy joins Trump's legal team

Former Rep. Trey GowdyHarold (Trey) Watson GowdySunday shows preview: Lawmakers prepare for week two of impeachment trial Green says House shouldn't hold impeachment articles indefinitely Trump golfs with Graham ahead of impeachment trial MORE (R-S.C.) has officially joined President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Don Lemon explains handling of segment after Trump criticism NPR reporter after Pompeo clash: Journalists don't interview government officials to score 'political points' Lawyer says Parnas can't attend Senate trial due to ankle bracelet MORE's outside legal defense team as the president gears up for an impeachment battle with the House.

Trump's personal attorney, Jay SekulowJay Alan SekulowTrump's team rests, calls for quick end to trial Trump lawyers to wrap up impeachment defense What to watch for on Day 7 of the Trump impeachment trial MORE, confirmed in a statement Wednesday night that Gowdy would serve as counsel to the president.

"I have known Trey for years and worked with him when he served in Congress. His legal skills and his advocacy will serve the President well," Sekulow said. "Trey’s command of the law is well known and his service on Capitol Hill will be a great asset as a member of our team.”

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Sekulow had said Tuesday that Gowdy was in talks to join the president's legal team.

Gowdy is a career prosecutor who served four terms in Congress. He retired in January at the conclusion of his final term and joined Fox News as a contributor. Fox News cut ties with Gowdy on Wednesday ahead of Sekulow's announcement.

He previously served as the chairman of the House Oversight and Reform Committee and led the House Select Committee on Benghazi, where he grilled former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHill.TV's Krystal Ball: Failure to embrace Sanders as nominee would 'destroy' Democratic Party Clinton says she feels the 'urge' to defeat Trump in 2020 Can Democrats flip the Texas House? Today's result will provide a clue MORE and other Obama administration officials over their roles and knowledge of the 2012 attack on the U.S. Consulate in the eastern Libyan city.

Gowdy's insistence on administrative compliance with congressional investigations while serving in the House is at odds with the White House's most recent approach to the impeachment inquiry.

White House counsel Pat Cipollone sent a letter to Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats offer mixed reactions to Trump's Mideast peace plan James Taylor to perform at awards ceremony for Ruth Bader Ginsburg this week Trump offers two-state peace plan for Israeli-Palestinian conflict amid skepticism MORE (D-Calif.) and three committee leaders on Tuesday stating that the administration would not cooperate with any of their requests related to the impeachment inquiry.

Pelosi announced late last month that the House would formally launch an impeachment inquiry into Trump, alleging he abused his office by urging Ukraine's president to “look into” Democratic presidential candidate Joe BidenJoe BidenPerry delegation talking points stressed pushing Ukraine to deal with 'corruption' GOP senator airs anti-Biden ad in Iowa amid impeachment trial Biden photobombs live national news broadcast at one of his rallies MORE.

Democratic committee leaders have in recent days issued subpoenas demanding records from the White House, Vice President Pence, the Office of Management and Budget, the Pentagon and Trump’s personal lawyer Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiLawyer says Parnas can't attend Senate trial due to ankle bracelet Perry delegation talking points stressed pushing Ukraine to deal with 'corruption' Giuliani calls Bolton a 'backstabber' over Ukraine allegations MORE as part of the investigation.

Trump said Wednesday that he would consider cooperating with the impeachment inquiry if the House formally voted to approve rules for the investigation and if those rules were "fair."