Trump blasts New York Times for citing Fox News impeachment poll

President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP divided over impeachment trial strategy Official testifies that Bolton had 'one-on-one meeting' with Trump over Ukraine aid Louisiana governor wins re-election MORE on Monday blasted The New York Times for using in one of its stories last week's Fox News poll that said a majority of respondents wanted his impeachment.

"The Fox Impeachment poll has turned out to be incorrect," he tweeted Monday. "This was announced on Friday. Despite this, the Corrupt New York Times used this poll in one of its stories, no mention of the correction which they knew about full well!"

The president appeared to be referring a New York Post analysis that said the poll underrepresented Republican and independent voters. The Post said if the poll was weighted correctly, it would have found 44.9 percent of respondents in support of impeachment and 44.4 percent against. 

Fox News Vice President of Public Opinion Research Dana Blanton in a statement said the network stood by its latest poll and that it used randomly chosen registered voters to reach its conclusions.

“Our polling unit has long been held in high regard for being a nonpartisan source of research," Blanton said in the statement. "Under the joint direction of Beacon Research (D) and Shaw & Company (R), the latest FNC poll included interviews with randomly chosen registered voters and – as is our standard practice – we reported the partisan distribution we found among the electorate. Braun Research is solely our data collection partner. We stand by our latest poll.”

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The president has lashed out against Fox News polling after the poll results were released last week, saying 51 percent of people supported his impeachment and removal from office. 

Opponents to the poll have cited the number of Democratic respondents in the poll as the reason for the impeachment numbers. Forty-eight percent of participants were Democrat, 40 percent were Republican and 12 percent identified as independent or other.