Kellyanne Conway: Trump 'needs to tweet like we need to eat'

Kellyanne Conway: Trump 'needs to tweet like we need to eat'
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White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayVaping advocates feel confident Trump will turn from flavor ban Impeachment week: Trump probe hits crucial point Krystal Ball praises former McConnell aide's historic win in Kentucky MORE defended President Trump’s Twitter habits in an interview with The New York Times for the newspaper’s analysis of the president’s more than 11,000 tweets. 

“He needs to tweet like we need to eat,” Conway told the Times. 

The newspaper analyzed the 11,390 presidential tweets and found that in more than half of them, Trump used the platform to attack someone or something, according to the story published Saturday.

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Trump has attacked at least 630 people and things in 5,889 tweets since taking office, according to the Times. 

Other tweets were used to promote conspiracy theories, including 40 tweets about voter fraud and a “rigged” electoral system.

White House officials early in Trump’s presidency discussed the possibility of a 15-minute delay on Trump’s account, but the president worried it would make his tweets irrelevant, the Times reported, citing a former White House official. 

Trump has consistently touted the influence his Twitter account has on the mainstream media.

Speaking to conservative social media personalities at a White House conference, he said, “Boom. I press it, and, within two seconds, ‘We have breaking news,’” the Times noted. 

The president’s Twitter habits have also brought attention to the social media platform’s policy, with some accusing Trump of having violated the platform’s rules. 

Twitter announced it took “newsworthiness” into account when deciding whether to remove a post that violated the platform’s policies after Trump tweeted that North Korea might not “be around much longer” in September 2017, leading some to fear Trump may tweet his way into a nuclear war.

The tweet was taken as a declaration of war by North Korea. 

Twitter executives told the Times that newsworthiness had long factored into its account of internal enforcement guidelines, but former employees told the newspaper that they understood the announcement was spurred by Trump. 

Spokespeople for the White House and Twitter were not immediately available for comment.