White House warns against including wall restrictions in stopgap bill

White House warns against including wall restrictions in stopgap bill

The White House is open to another stopgap spending bill, according to a top aide, but the Trump administration is also warning Democrats against including any border wall restrictions in the short-term bill needed to avoid a government shutdown.

Office of Legislative Affairs Director Eric Ueland said Tuesday that the White House is open to another continuing resolution to fund the government beyond Nov. 21 “as long as it does not restrict [President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump faces high stakes in meeting with Erdoğan amid impeachment drama Democrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Trump threatening to fire Mulvaney: report MORE’s] authorities or abilities to pursue his policy priorities, including wall construction.”

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“We’re heartened to have continuing conversations with appropriate parties in Congress on the regular order spending bills, as well as a continuing resolution,” Ueland said ahead of a closed-door Senate GOP lunch on Capitol Hill.

To avoid a shutdown on Nov. 22, lawmakers will need to pass either the 12 appropriations bills or another continuing resolution to avoid a second shutdown this year.

The White House had previously asked for the current continuing resolution, signed in late September, to lift a restriction included in the fiscal 2019 funding bills that requires any border barrier money to be limited to the Rio Grande Valley sector.

Congress rejected the White House request to lift those restrictions in the funding measure, which extends fiscal 2019 spending levels through Nov. 21. Ueland sidestepped a question about whether the White House would need the Rio Grande Valley restriction lifted as part of the next short-term bill.

Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoHillicon Valley: Facebook to remove mentions of potential whistleblower's name | House Dems demand FCC action over leak of location data | Dem presses regulators to secure health care data Senators introduce bill to create 'parity' among broadband programs Republicans warn election results are 'wake-up call' for Trump MORE (W.Va.), a member of GOP leadership whose Appropriations subcommittee oversees funding for the Homeland Security Department, warned that there wasn’t “any kind of appetite” for another shutdown.

“I think [Trump] knows the feeling up here on the Hill and I don’t think it was a particularly enjoyable thing for him either,” she told The Hill.

Earlier this year, a record 35-day partial shutdown ended with Trump declaring a national emergency to leapfrog Congress and get more wall funding.

Although the Senate passed a package of four spending bills last week — its first for the 2020 fiscal year, which began Oct. 1 — Democrats say they cannot reconcile the legislation with the House versions until they agree on spending allocations for each of the 12 funding measures.

Negotiations on the top-line spending figures have been complicated largely by questions about potential wall funding. Trump has requested $8.6 billion for the wall in fiscal 2020 — an amount that is unlikely to pass both chambers of Congress.

Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyOn The Money: Trump seeks to shift spotlight from impeachment to economy | Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline | New study says tariffs threaten 1.5M jobs Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline Congress hunts for path out of spending stalemate MORE (R-Ala.) and House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyOn The Money: Trump seeks to shift spotlight from impeachment to economy | Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline | New study says tariffs threaten 1.5M jobs Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline Congress hunts for path out of spending stalemate MORE (D-N.Y.) have said another continuing resolution will be needed this month, though the length of the prospective stopgap is uncertain.

Ueland declined to weigh in on a time frame, saying it was up to congressional leadership to pitch the White House on a potential end date.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiGiuliani pens op-ed slamming 'unprecedented' impeachment inquiry Brindisi, Lamb recommended for Armed Services, Transportation Committees Overnight Health Care: Top health official defends contract payments to Trump allies | Vaping advocates confident Trump will turn from flavor ban | Sanders gets endorsement from nurses union MORE (D-Calif.) said she has been in talks with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell protege emerges as Kentucky's next rising star Hillicon Valley: Schumer questions Army over use of TikTok | Federal court rules against random searches of travelers' phones | Groups push for election security funds in stopgap bill | Facebook's new payment feature | Disney+ launch hit by glitches McConnell, GOP leaders say they won't be watching House impeachment hearing MORE (R-Ky.) to find a way forward on spending legislation. McConnell, Senate GOP leadership and members of Democratic House leadership, including Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerCongress hunts for path out of spending stalemate The Hill's 12:30 Report: Washington braces for public impeachment hearings This week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry MORE (Md.), are all said to favor an earlier, December deadline.

Both Shelby and Lowey have floated a February or March time frame, though Shelby and Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntMcConnell, GOP leaders say they won't be watching House impeachment hearing Congress hunts for path out of spending stalemate GOP senators plan to tune out impeachment week MORE (Mo.), a member of GOP leadership, have indicated they would prefer a continuing resolution that doesn’t go beyond the end of the year.

“I think that’s the goal of the Speaker and McConnell ... that would be wonderful, that would be better than my assessment. My assessment was it could run through February,” Shelby told reporters Tuesday, adding that he would “love” to meet a December deadline.