Trump has considered firing official who reported whistleblower complaint to Congress: report

President TrumpDonald John TrumpJustice says it will recommend Trump veto FISA bill Fauci: Nominating conventions may be able to go on as planned Poll: Biden leads Trump by 11 points nationally MORE has considered firing the official who reported the whistleblower complaint to Congress, The New York Times reported Tuesday.

The president has weighed getting rid of the intelligence community's inspector general, Michael Atkinson, because he provided the whistleblower complaint to Congress that sparked the impeachment inquiry, four people familiar with the discussions told the Times.

ADVERTISEMENT
Trump was reportedly upset when the whistleblower report was published in September and has considered firing the inspector general more recently because he does not understand why Atkinson shared the complaint, one source told the Times.

The whistleblower report detailed how Trump asked the Ukrainian president to investigate unfounded corruption allegations into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenProsecutor investigating whether Tara Reade gave false testimony as expert witness Poll: Biden leads Trump by 11 points nationally George Floyd's sister says Minneapolis officers should be charged with murder MORE and his son days after withholding military aid from the country.

Trump has blasted the inspector general on Twitter and indicated that he thinks Atkinson should have to testify in the impeachment inquiry alongside the whistleblower. 

It is unknown how far the consideration of firing Atkinson went, with two sources telling the Times they thought Trump was just venting and not talking about serious consequences for the inspector general.

However, the president condemned former FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyNew FBI document confirms the Trump campaign was investigated without justification FBI director Wray orders internal review of Flynn case Grenell says intelligence community working to declassify Flynn-Kislyak transcripts MORE and former Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsThe Memo: Trump tweets cross into new territory Sessions goes after Tuberville's coaching record in challenging him to debate The 10 Senate seats most likely to flip MORE before he removed them for disloyalty.

Inspector generals are supposed to remain independent from partisan beliefs and provide objective accountability.

People close to Trump told the Times that they thought removing Atkinson could damage the president going into the impeachment proceedings; his firing of Comey led to the appointment of former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE to investigate his campaign's alleged ties to Russia.

Atkinson originally reported the whistleblower complaint to acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph MaguireJoseph MaguireTop intel official leaving post Grenell announces creation of intelligence community 'cyber executive' Ratcliffe refuses to say whether Russian election interference favored Trump MORE, who refused to turn over the document to Congress but allowed the inspector general to inform Congress that the complaint existed. Eventually, Maguire handed over the whistleblower report, which was made public at the end of September.

Lawyers for Maguire and the Justice Department maintain that because the president is not a part of the intelligence community, Atkinson had no authority to send the report, according to the Times.

Trump has grouped Atkinson in with other opponents he wants to testify in front of the House, including Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiMcCarthy urges Democrats to pull surveillance bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Major space launch today; Trump feuds with Twitter How lawmaker ties helped shape Fed chairman's COVID-19 response MORE (D-Calif.), Rep. Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffMcCarthy urges Democrats to pull surveillance bill Key Senate Democrat withdraws support from House measure on web browsing data Trump urges GOP to vote against bill reauthorizing surveillance powers MORE (D-Calif.), Biden and the whistleblower.

The Times's report comes the day before the first public impeachment hearings. The initial testimony from former and current Trump officials took place behind closed doors.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment.