Trump: 'Everybody knows who the whistleblower is'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpSanders urges impeachment trial 'quickly' in the Senate US sending 20,000 troops to Europe for largest exercises since Cold War Barr criticizes FBI, says it's possible agents acted in 'bad faith' in Trump probe MORE on Friday claimed the identity of the whistleblower who first raised concerns about his relationship with Ukraine is known to everyone in D.C.

"Everyone in Washington knows who it is, by the way. The whistleblower is no great secret," Trump told "The Dan Bongino Show," without naming a name. "Everybody knows who the whistleblower is, and [it] has to be revealed."

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Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulPelosi gets standing ovation at Kennedy Center Honors Senate braces for brawl on Trump impeachment rules Trump's legal team huddles with Senate Republicans MORE (R-Ky.) and other conservative figures have in media interviews made claims about the name of the anonymous whistleblower who filed a complaint regarding a July 25 conversation between Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky. Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpWhite House calls Democratic witness's mentioning of president's youngest son 'classless' Lawmakers to watch during Wednesday's impeachment hearing Top Democrats knock Trump on World AIDS Day MORE has also tweeted an unproven claim about the whistleblower's identity.

"We will not confirm or deny any name that is published or promoted by supporters of the President," the whistleblower's attorneys, from the Compass Rose Legal Group, said in a statement earlier this month. "Disclosure of any name undermines the integrity of the whistleblower system and will deter any future whistleblowers."

Trump has also previously called for the media to reveal the whistleblower's identity. 

The Hill has not named the individual, and it is typically the policy of major news outlets not to reveal the identity of whistleblowers, who are federally protected against retribution.

The whistleblower's complaint raised concerns about the phone call between Trump and Zelensky in which the two leaders discussed former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe media have fallen out of love with Bernie, but have voters? Top Zelensky aide refutes Sondland testimony The great AI debate: What candidates are (finally) saying about artificial intelligence MORE and his son Hunter Biden. The complaint also alleged "efforts to restrict access to records related to the call."

The White House has now released a rough transcript of the July 25 call, and the House has launched an impeachment inquiry into Trump. The whistleblower's attorneys argue that their identity has become irrelevant due to the release of information that supersedes the complaint.

Trump again said Friday the impeachment inquiry is part of an ongoing "witch hunt" against him and connected it to former special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerTrump says he'll release financial records before election, knocks Dems' efforts House impeachment hearings: The witch hunt continues Speier says impeachment inquiry shows 'very strong case of bribery' by Trump MORE's investigation into Russian attempts to help Trump in the 2016 election.

"We went through the whole Russia hoax ... I had about three days of rest and then I had this thing hit me based on a perfect phone call with a very nice person who I think is going to do a good job," Trump told Bongino, who is a Fox News contributor. "This is just out of the blue that this came up."