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Pompeo says 'we don't know when, we don't know where' Soleimani had planned 'imminent attacks'

Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoBiden taps career civil servants to acting posts at State, USAID, UN China sanctions Pompeo and more than two dozen US figures China calls Pompeo 'doomsday clown' after its treatment of Uighurs labeled genocide MORE told Laura IngrahamLaura Anne IngrahamFox News to revamp daytime programming, replace 7 pm news hour with opinion show Sacking the Capitol proves free speech is in trouble FBI: No evidence antifa involved in Capitol riot MORE in a sit-down interview Thursday night that while the U.S. did not know where or when Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani was planning to attack, it was a "real" threat to U.S. assets in the Middle East. 

The U.S. killed Soleimani in a drone strike last week ordered by President TrumpDonald TrumpClinton, Bush, Obama reflect on peaceful transition of power on Biden's Inauguration Day Arizona Republican's brothers say he is 'at least partially to blame' for Capitol violence Biden reverses Trump's freeze on .4 billion in funds MORE that has further inflamed U.S.-Iran tensions.

"There is no doubt that there were a series of imminent attacks being plotted by Qassem Soleimani," Pompeo told the Fox News host. "We don't know precisely when and we don't know precisely where, but it was real."

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Iran promised a proportional retaliation after the strike killing Soleimani, and on Tuesday it launched a missile strike on two Iraqi bases that house U.S. troops. No American casualties were sustained.

While most Republicans have backed Trump's decision to authorize the strike on Soleimani, Democrats have criticized the administration, and two Republicans — Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSenate confirms Biden's intel chief, giving him first Cabinet official Republicans wrestle over removing Trump Lawmakers, leaders offer condolences following the death of Capitol Police officer MORE (Utah) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulSenate confirms Biden's intel chief, giving him first Cabinet official McConnell faces conservative backlash over Trump criticism McConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time MORE (Ky.) — complained a briefing this week explaining the intelligence behind the strike was insulting. The two conservatives senators are normally staunch supporters of Trump, though they are also leery of U.S. involvement in military action in the Middle East.

In his interview with Ingraham, Pompeo, who was one of the congressional briefers, defended the briefing.

"I thought we did a dynamite job," Pompeo said. "We did our level best to do present them with all the facts that we could in that setting," he said, adding, "We shared an awful lot with them yesterday."

On Thursday, with a vote of 224-194, the House passed a war powers resolution that would direct the president to end military hostilities with Iran unless Congress specifically authorizes it or the United States faces an “imminent armed attack.”