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Pompeo says 'we don't know when, we don't know where' Soleimani had planned 'imminent attacks'

Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans US Olympic Committee urges Congress not to boycott Games in China Pompeo on CIA recruitment: We can't risk national security to appease 'liberal, woke agenda' MORE told Laura IngrahamLaura Anne IngrahamDeSantis says he'll pardon people who violate mask laws Officer who responded to Capitol mob urges leaders to recognize 'courage' of law enforcement Officer who suffered heart attack on Jan. 6 knocks 'dangerous' Trump comments MORE in a sit-down interview Thursday night that while the U.S. did not know where or when Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani was planning to attack, it was a "real" threat to U.S. assets in the Middle East. 

The U.S. killed Soleimani in a drone strike last week ordered by President TrumpDonald TrumpSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Navajo Nation president on Arizona's new voting restrictions: An 'assault' on our rights The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez MORE that has further inflamed U.S.-Iran tensions.

"There is no doubt that there were a series of imminent attacks being plotted by Qassem Soleimani," Pompeo told the Fox News host. "We don't know precisely when and we don't know precisely where, but it was real."

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Iran promised a proportional retaliation after the strike killing Soleimani, and on Tuesday it launched a missile strike on two Iraqi bases that house U.S. troops. No American casualties were sustained.

While most Republicans have backed Trump's decision to authorize the strike on Soleimani, Democrats have criticized the administration, and two Republicans — Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Energy: Colonial Pipeline says it has restored full service | Biden urges people not to panic about gasoline shortages | EPA rescinds Trump-era cost-benefit rule Senate panel advances Biden's deputy Interior pick Hillicon Valley: Global cybersecurity leaders say they feel unprepared for attack | Senate Commerce Committee advances Biden's FTC nominee Lina Khan | Senate panel approves bill that would invest billions in tech MORE (Utah) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP lawmaker calls for Wuhan probe to 'prevent the next pandemic' All congressional Democrats say they have been vaccinated: CNN Fauci on Rand Paul: 'I just don't understand what the problem is with him' MORE (Ky.) — complained a briefing this week explaining the intelligence behind the strike was insulting. The two conservatives senators are normally staunch supporters of Trump, though they are also leery of U.S. involvement in military action in the Middle East.

In his interview with Ingraham, Pompeo, who was one of the congressional briefers, defended the briefing.

"I thought we did a dynamite job," Pompeo said. "We did our level best to do present them with all the facts that we could in that setting," he said, adding, "We shared an awful lot with them yesterday."

On Thursday, with a vote of 224-194, the House passed a war powers resolution that would direct the president to end military hostilities with Iran unless Congress specifically authorizes it or the United States faces an “imminent armed attack.”