Pompeo says 'we don't know when, we don't know where' Soleimani had planned 'imminent attacks'

Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoHillicon Valley: Facebook considers political ad ban | Senators raise concerns over civil rights audit | Amazon reverses on telling workers to delete TikTok Amazon backtracks, says email asking employees to delete TikTok was sent in error Amazon asks employees to delete TikTok from mobile devices: report MORE told Laura IngrahamLaura Anne IngrahamThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook- Schools weigh reopening options Trump's July 4 weekend comes with COVID-19 backdrop Trump dings CNN, 'Morning Joe' ratings as Tucker Carlson sets record MORE in a sit-down interview Thursday night that while the U.S. did not know where or when Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani was planning to attack, it was a "real" threat to U.S. assets in the Middle East. 

The U.S. killed Soleimani in a drone strike last week ordered by President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats blast Trump for commuting Roger Stone: 'The most corrupt president in history' Trump confirms 2018 US cyberattack on Russian troll farm Trump tweets his support for Goya Foods amid boycott MORE that has further inflamed U.S.-Iran tensions.

"There is no doubt that there were a series of imminent attacks being plotted by Qassem Soleimani," Pompeo told the Fox News host. "We don't know precisely when and we don't know precisely where, but it was real."

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Iran promised a proportional retaliation after the strike killing Soleimani, and on Tuesday it launched a missile strike on two Iraqi bases that house U.S. troops. No American casualties were sustained.

While most Republicans have backed Trump's decision to authorize the strike on Soleimani, Democrats have criticized the administration, and two Republicans — Sens. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeKoch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads Gianforte halts in-person campaigning after wife, running mate attend event with Guilfoyle Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers to address alarming spike in coronavirus cases MORE (Utah) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulKoch-backed group urges Senate to oppose 'bailouts' of states in new ads How conservative conspiracy theories are deepening America's political divide Gianforte halts in-person campaigning after wife, running mate attend event with Guilfoyle MORE (Ky.) — complained a briefing this week explaining the intelligence behind the strike was insulting. The two conservatives senators are normally staunch supporters of Trump, though they are also leery of U.S. involvement in military action in the Middle East.

In his interview with Ingraham, Pompeo, who was one of the congressional briefers, defended the briefing.

"I thought we did a dynamite job," Pompeo said. "We did our level best to do present them with all the facts that we could in that setting," he said, adding, "We shared an awful lot with them yesterday."

On Thursday, with a vote of 224-194, the House passed a war powers resolution that would direct the president to end military hostilities with Iran unless Congress specifically authorizes it or the United States faces an “imminent armed attack.”