Trump indicates he'd block Bolton's testimony 'for the sake of the office'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump's newest Russia adviser, Andrew Peek, leaves post: report Hawley expects McConnell's final impeachment resolution to give White House defense ability to motion to dismiss Trump rips New York City sea wall: 'Costly, foolish' and 'environmentally unfriendly idea' MORE on Friday indicated that he would block former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonDemocrats file brief against Trump, 'the Framers' worst nightmare' Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers gear up for Senate impeachment trial Pelosi offers message to Trump on Bill Maher show: 'You are impeached forever' MORE from testifying in the Senate’s impeachment trial, arguing that allowing him to do so would undermine his office's authority.

“I think you have to for the sake of the office,” Trump told Fox News’s Laura IngrahamLaura Anne IngrahamBill Kristol on McSally calling CNN reporter a liberal hack: 'I guess I'm liberal' McSally dismisses calls to apologize to CNN's Raju for 'liberal hack' comment: 'Called it like it is' State Department cancels two classified congressional briefings on Iran, embassy security MORE when asked if he would use executive privilege to block testimony from Bolton.

“Especially a national security adviser,” he added. “You can’t have him explaining all of your statements about national security concerning Russia, China and North Korea — everything. We just can’t do that.”

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The president rattled off several other officials he said he would like to testify, including acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyDemocrats file brief against Trump, 'the Framers' worst nightmare' Parnas pressure grows on Senate GOP Trump trial poses toughest test yet for Roberts MORE, Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoSunday shows preview: Lawmakers gear up for Senate impeachment trial Parnas pressure grows on Senate GOP Dems plan marathon prep for Senate trial, wary of Trump trying to 'game' the process MORE and former Energy Secretary Rick PerryRick PerrySunday shows preview: Lawmakers gear up for Senate impeachment trial Parnas pressure grows on Senate GOP Overnight Energy: Appeals court tosses kids' climate suit | California sues Trump over fracking | Oversight finds EPA appointees slow-walked ethics obligations MORE but said allowing them to do so could hurt future presidents.

“I would love everybody to testify,” Trump said. “I'd like Mick to testify. I'd like Mike Pompeo to testify. I'd like Rick Perry to testify. I want everybody — but there are things that you can’t do from the standpoint of executive privilege.” 

The comments mark a doubling down by Trump, who signaled earlier this week he would block Bolton from appearing before the Senate.

“So we have to protect presidential privilege — for me but for future presidents,” he said. 

Bolton said in a statement Monday that he would be willing to testify in a Senate impeachment trial if subpoenaed, even over administration objections. Democrats have clamored to hear from the former national security adviser because of his intimate knowledge of Trump’s dealings with Ukraine, the focal point of the impeachment articles against him. 

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Bolton described the effort by administration officials to press Ukraine for investigations into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden alleges Sanders campaign 'doctored video' to attack him on Social Security record Sanders campaign responds to Biden doctored video claims: Biden should 'stop trying to doctor' public record Capt. "Sully" Sullenberger pens op-ed in defense of Biden: 'I stuttered once, too. I dare you to mock me' MORE, a chief political rival, and Biden's son Hunter as a “drug deal,” according to witnesses who testified in front of the House during its impeachment inquiry. Bolton’s attorneys have also said he has relevant information on meetings and conversations regarding Ukraine.

However, the Senate seems set to pass a resolution defining the parameters for its trial that does not include provisions for witness-calling, with Republicans apparently in agreement on rules for the proceedings.

The House impeached Trump in December for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress after Democrats say he made security aid and a White House meeting for Ukraine contingent on the country announcing investigations that could help him politically.