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Trump indicates he'd block Bolton's testimony 'for the sake of the office'

President TrumpDonald TrumpFreedom Caucus member condemns GOP group pushing 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions' MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell's new free speech site to ban certain curse words Secret Facebook groups of special operations officers include racist comments, QAnon posts: report MORE on Friday indicated that he would block former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonHillicon Valley: Facebook Oversight board to rule on Trump ban in 'coming weeks' | Russia blocks Biden Cabinet officials in retaliation for sanctions Russia blocks key Biden Cabinet officials from entering in retaliation for sanctions The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - US vaccine effort takes hit with Johnson & Johnson pause MORE from testifying in the Senate’s impeachment trial, arguing that allowing him to do so would undermine his office's authority.

“I think you have to for the sake of the office,” Trump told Fox News’s Laura IngrahamLaura Anne IngrahamTucker Carlson debuts his first major streaming show on Fox Nation Trump says Capitol rioters posed 'zero threat' Trump says press asked Biden 'softball' questions MORE when asked if he would use executive privilege to block testimony from Bolton.

“Especially a national security adviser,” he added. “You can’t have him explaining all of your statements about national security concerning Russia, China and North Korea — everything. We just can’t do that.”

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The president rattled off several other officials he said he would like to testify, including acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyHeadhunters having hard time finding jobs for former Trump officials: report Trump holdovers are denying Social Security benefits to the hardest working Americans Mulvaney calls Trump's comments on Capitol riot 'manifestly false' MORE, Secretary of State Mike PompeoMike PompeoPompeo violated ethics rules, State Department watchdog finds Why the US needs to clear the way for international justice Tim Scott to participate in GOP event in Iowa MORE and former Energy Secretary Rick PerryRick PerryOvernight Energy: Michigan reps reintroduce measure for national 'forever chemicals' standard |  White House says gas tax won't be part of infrastructure bill Trump alumni launch America First Policy Institute Senators urge Energy chief to prioritize cybersecurity amid growing threats MORE but said allowing them to do so could hurt future presidents.

“I would love everybody to testify,” Trump said. “I'd like Mick to testify. I'd like Mike Pompeo to testify. I'd like Rick Perry to testify. I want everybody — but there are things that you can’t do from the standpoint of executive privilege.” 

The comments mark a doubling down by Trump, who signaled earlier this week he would block Bolton from appearing before the Senate.

“So we have to protect presidential privilege — for me but for future presidents,” he said. 

Bolton said in a statement Monday that he would be willing to testify in a Senate impeachment trial if subpoenaed, even over administration objections. Democrats have clamored to hear from the former national security adviser because of his intimate knowledge of Trump’s dealings with Ukraine, the focal point of the impeachment articles against him. 

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Bolton described the effort by administration officials to press Ukraine for investigations into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFour members of Sikh community among victims in Indianapolis shooting Overnight Health: NIH reverses Trump's ban on fetal tissue research | Biden investing .7B to fight virus variants | CDC panel to meet again Friday on J&J On The Money: Moderates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats | Justice Dept. sues Trump ally Roger Stone for unpaid taxes MORE, a chief political rival, and Biden's son Hunter as a “drug deal,” according to witnesses who testified in front of the House during its impeachment inquiry. Bolton’s attorneys have also said he has relevant information on meetings and conversations regarding Ukraine.

However, the Senate seems set to pass a resolution defining the parameters for its trial that does not include provisions for witness-calling, with Republicans apparently in agreement on rules for the proceedings.

The House impeached Trump in December for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress after Democrats say he made security aid and a White House meeting for Ukraine contingent on the country announcing investigations that could help him politically.