Trump indicates he'd block Bolton's testimony 'for the sake of the office'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpWayfair refutes QAnon-like conspiracy theory that it's trafficking children Stone rails against US justice system in first TV interview since Trump commuted his sentence Federal appeals court rules Trump admin can't withhold federal grants from California sanctuary cities MORE on Friday indicated that he would block former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonJudge lifts restraining order on Mary Trump on eve of book's release The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Argentum - All eyes on Florida as daily COVID-19 cases hit 15K Juan Williams: Trump's silence on Russian bounties betrays America MORE from testifying in the Senate’s impeachment trial, arguing that allowing him to do so would undermine his office's authority.

“I think you have to for the sake of the office,” Trump told Fox News’s Laura IngrahamLaura Anne IngrahamThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook- Schools weigh reopening options Trump's July 4 weekend comes with COVID-19 backdrop Trump dings CNN, 'Morning Joe' ratings as Tucker Carlson sets record MORE when asked if he would use executive privilege to block testimony from Bolton.

“Especially a national security adviser,” he added. “You can’t have him explaining all of your statements about national security concerning Russia, China and North Korea — everything. We just can’t do that.”

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The president rattled off several other officials he said he would like to testify, including acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyTrump's former chief of staff hits coronavirus efforts: 'We still have a testing problem' Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Chris Christie Trump admin lifts ban on sales of silencers to private foreign buyers MORE, Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoOvernight Defense: US formally rejects Beijing's South China Sea claims | House set to consider defense policy bill next week | 57 injured as firefighters battle warship blaze Pompeo formally rejects Beijing's claims in South China Sea Wells Fargo told employees to delete TikTok from work phones MORE and former Energy Secretary Rick PerryRick Perry4 Texas GOP congressional primary runoffs to watch Texas cities say state is making pandemic worse Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Ernest Moniz MORE but said allowing them to do so could hurt future presidents.

“I would love everybody to testify,” Trump said. “I'd like Mick to testify. I'd like Mike Pompeo to testify. I'd like Rick Perry to testify. I want everybody — but there are things that you can’t do from the standpoint of executive privilege.” 

The comments mark a doubling down by Trump, who signaled earlier this week he would block Bolton from appearing before the Senate.

“So we have to protect presidential privilege — for me but for future presidents,” he said. 

Bolton said in a statement Monday that he would be willing to testify in a Senate impeachment trial if subpoenaed, even over administration objections. Democrats have clamored to hear from the former national security adviser because of his intimate knowledge of Trump’s dealings with Ukraine, the focal point of the impeachment articles against him. 

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Bolton described the effort by administration officials to press Ukraine for investigations into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenThe Hill's Campaign Report: Runoff elections in Texas, Alabama set for Tuesday Biden campaign slams White House attacks on Fauci as 'disgusting' Biden lets Trump be Trump MORE, a chief political rival, and Biden's son Hunter as a “drug deal,” according to witnesses who testified in front of the House during its impeachment inquiry. Bolton’s attorneys have also said he has relevant information on meetings and conversations regarding Ukraine.

However, the Senate seems set to pass a resolution defining the parameters for its trial that does not include provisions for witness-calling, with Republicans apparently in agreement on rules for the proceedings.

The House impeached Trump in December for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress after Democrats say he made security aid and a White House meeting for Ukraine contingent on the country announcing investigations that could help him politically.