Trump indicates he'd block Bolton's testimony 'for the sake of the office'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump orders US troops back to active duty for coronavirus response Trump asserts power to decide info inspector general for stimulus gives Congress Fighting a virus with the wrong tools MORE on Friday indicated that he would block former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonBolton defends decision to shutter NSC pandemic office US retaliates with missile strikes in Iraq The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the APTA - A huge night for Joe Biden MORE from testifying in the Senate’s impeachment trial, arguing that allowing him to do so would undermine his office's authority.

“I think you have to for the sake of the office,” Trump told Fox News’s Laura IngrahamLaura Anne IngrahamTrump team fiercely debates how long coronavirus restrictions should stay in place Laura Ingraham on testing anti-malaria drug for coronavirus: 'I'll happily volunteer' Warren makes surprise appearance on 'Saturday Night Live' after dropping out of 2020 race MORE when asked if he would use executive privilege to block testimony from Bolton.

“Especially a national security adviser,” he added. “You can’t have him explaining all of your statements about national security concerning Russia, China and North Korea — everything. We just can’t do that.”

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The president rattled off several other officials he said he would like to testify, including acting White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyTrump to nominate Russell Vought as budget chief Warren, Brown press consumer bureau on auto lending oversight Bottom line MORE, Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoHillicon Valley: Apple rolls out coronavirus screening app, website | Pompeo urged to crack down on coronavirus misinformation from China | Senators push FTC on price gouging | Instacart workers threaten strike COVID-19 intensifies the case for blacklisting Khalifa Haftar  House Republican urges Pompeo to take steps to limit misinformation from China on coronavirus MORE and former Energy Secretary Rick PerryRick PerryThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump takes unexpected step to stem coronavirus Top National Security Council aide moved to Energy Department role Overnight Energy: Green groups to sue over Trump rollback of Obama water rules | GOP climate plan faces pushback from right | Bezos launches B climate initiative MORE but said allowing them to do so could hurt future presidents.

“I would love everybody to testify,” Trump said. “I'd like Mick to testify. I'd like Mike Pompeo to testify. I'd like Rick Perry to testify. I want everybody — but there are things that you can’t do from the standpoint of executive privilege.” 

The comments mark a doubling down by Trump, who signaled earlier this week he would block Bolton from appearing before the Senate.

“So we have to protect presidential privilege — for me but for future presidents,” he said. 

Bolton said in a statement Monday that he would be willing to testify in a Senate impeachment trial if subpoenaed, even over administration objections. Democrats have clamored to hear from the former national security adviser because of his intimate knowledge of Trump’s dealings with Ukraine, the focal point of the impeachment articles against him. 

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Bolton described the effort by administration officials to press Ukraine for investigations into former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenFighting a virus with the wrong tools Trump bucks business on Defense Production Act Overnight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — US coronavirus cases hit 100,000 | Trump signs T stimulus package | Trump employs defense powers to force GM to make ventilators | New concerns over virus testing MORE, a chief political rival, and Biden's son Hunter as a “drug deal,” according to witnesses who testified in front of the House during its impeachment inquiry. Bolton’s attorneys have also said he has relevant information on meetings and conversations regarding Ukraine.

However, the Senate seems set to pass a resolution defining the parameters for its trial that does not include provisions for witness-calling, with Republicans apparently in agreement on rules for the proceedings.

The House impeached Trump in December for abuse of power and obstruction of Congress after Democrats say he made security aid and a White House meeting for Ukraine contingent on the country announcing investigations that could help him politically.