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Trump accuses Democrats of a 'con job' as impeachment managers are announced

President TrumpDonald John TrumpStephen Miller: Trump to further crackdown on illegal immigration if he wins US records 97,000 new COVID-19 cases, shattering daily record Biden leads Trump by 8 points nationally: poll MORE on Wednesday accused House Democrats of a “con job” shortly after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 | Lawmakers see better prospects for COVID deal after election Overnight Health Care: House Dem report blasts Trump coronavirus response | Regeneron halts trial of antibody drug in sickest hospitalized patients | McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 MORE (D-Calif.) announced the lawmakers who would be managing the case to impeach him in the Senate. 

“Here we go again, another Con Job by the Do Nothing Democrats. All of this work was supposed to be done by the House, not the Senate!” Trump tweeted, seemingly referring to Democrats' push for the upper chamber to call witnesses in the impeachment trial.

Trump’s tweet suggested he was watching Pelosi’s press conference announcing the impeachment managers on Wednesday morning. The president is scheduled to participate in the signing of the “phase one” trade agreement between the United States and China later in the morning.

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The House is expected to vote Wednesday on submitting the impeachment articles to the Senate after Pelosi delayed submitting the articles – which accuse Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress – for several weeks in order to gain leverage for Democrats in the trial.

Pelosi has raised concerns about the fairness of the process in the GOP-controlled Senate after Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTop Senate GOP super PAC makes final .6M investment in Michigan Senate race On The Money: McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 | Lawmakers see better prospects for COVID deal after election Overnight Health Care: House Dem report blasts Trump coronavirus response | Regeneron halts trial of antibody drug in sickest hospitalized patients | McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 MORE (R-Ky.) said he was in “total coordination” with the White House counsel on how to handle the trial. 

Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerReestablishing American prosperity by investing in the 'Badger Belt' House Democrats introduce bill to invest 0 billion in STEM research and education Graham dismisses criticism from Fox Business's Lou Dobbs MORE (D-N.Y.) and other Democrats have pressed for witnesses like former national security adviser John BoltonJohn BoltonTrump administration pressured federal prosecutors to settle investigation into Turkish bank: report John Bolton in heated exchange with BBC anchor over lack of impeachment testimony President Trump: To know him is to 'No' him MORE to be called to testify. McConnell has argued against their demands, and only a small number of Republican senators have signaled they are open to calling witnesses. 

In a statement following Pelosi’s announcement, White House press secretary Stephanie GrishamStephanie GrishamMelania Trump cancels campaign appearance over 'lingering cough' The Memo: Trump grapples with credibility gap in crisis President Trump, Melania Trump test positive for COVID-19 MORE accused the Speaker of lying when she described the impeachment process as urgent and claimed she has been “focused on politics instead of the American people.”

"She failed and the naming of these managers does not change a single thing. President Trump has done nothing wrong. He looks forward to having the due process rights in the Senate that Speaker Pelosi and House Democrats denied to him, and expects to be fully exonerated,” Grisham said.

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Pelosi announced Wednesday that House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffCIA impeachment whistleblower forced to live under surveillance due to threats: report In our 'Bizarro World' of 2020 politics, the left takes a wrong turn Greenwald slams Schiff over Biden emails on Fox MORE (D-Calif.) will serve as the lead manager, joined by Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerMarijuana stocks see boost after Harris debate comments Jewish lawmakers targeted by anti-Semitic tweets ahead of election: ADL Democrats shoot down talk of expanding Supreme Court MORE (D-N.Y.), House Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesA tearful lesson of 2016: Polls don't matter if people don't vote Overnight Health Care: House Democrats slam pharma CEOs for price hikes driven by revenue, executive bonuses | Ex-FDA employees express worries to Congress over politicization of vaccines | Fauci said his mask stance was 'taken out of context' by Trump Top House Democrat: Parties 'much closer' to a COVID deal 'than we've ever been' MORE (D-N.Y.), Rep. Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsDisney to lay off 28,000 employees Florida Democrat introduces bill to recognize Puerto Rico statehood referendum Sunday shows - Trump team defends coronavirus response MORE (D-Fla.), Rep. Zoe LofgrenZoe Ellen LofgrenWhy prevailing wage reform matters for H-1B visas Fears grow of voter suppression in Texas Business groups start gaming out a Biden administration MORE (D-Calif.), Rep. Jason CrowJason CrowGiffords launches national Gun Owners for Safety group to combat the NRA House approves .2T COVID-19 relief bill as White House talks stall Lawmakers grill Pentagon over Trump's Germany drawdown MORE (D-Colo.) and Rep. Sylvia GarciaSylvia GarciaTexas social workers drop nondiscrimination rules for LGBTQ, disabilities Hispanic Caucus asks for Department of Labor meeting on COVID in meatpacking plants Texas Democrat proposes legislation requiring masks in federal facilities MORE (D-Texas). 

Pelosi and Schiff have been frequent targets of criticism from the president throughout the House impeachment proceedings, which began in late September and culminated in the vote to impeach the president last month.

The House voted nearly along party lines in December to impeach Trump for abusing his office in his dealings with Ukraine and obstructing the congressional inquiry into those dealings by refusing to turn over documents and blocking witnesses from testifying pursuant to subpoenas. 

Trump has maintained he did nothing wrong and that he did not pressure Ukraine’s leader, lambasting the impeachment inquiry as a "witch hunt." The White House has accused Democrats of a partisan and unfair effort to overturn the 2016 presidential election results.

At the center of Democrats’ case is a July 25 call with Ukraine’s president during which Trump asked him to look into a debunked theory about 2016 election interference as well as former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden leads Trump by 8 points nationally: poll Ivanka Trump raises million in a week for father's campaign On The Money: McConnell says Congress will take up stimulus package at start of 2021 | Lawmakers see better prospects for COVID deal after election MORE — a leading Democratic presidential contender — and his son Hunter’s dealings in Ukraine. 

Democrats argued Wednesday that there was overwhelming evidence that Trump abused his power by seeking foreign interference in the 2020 presidential election. Democrats also continued to push for the Senate to compel testimony from witnesses who did not testify in the House's impeachment inquiry.

The House heard from a handful of witnesses who described an unusual foreign policymaking channel run by the president’s personal attorney Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiGiuliani associate Correia pleads guilty to making false statements Spies are trying to influence the election — US spies, that is Giuliani goes off on Fox Business host after she compares him to Christopher Steele MORE. The witnesses described an effort within the administration to use a White House meeting and security assistance to Ukraine to press for investigations sought by Giuliani, which included probes into 2016 election interference and Burisma, a Ukrainian gas company whose board employed Hunter Biden.

But a number of key witnesses, like Bolton and White House chief of staff Mick MulvaneyMick MulvaneyGaffes put spotlight on Meadows at tough time for Trump Trump says he may lower corporate tax rate to 20 percent if reelected Is Social Security safe from the courts? MORE, did not agree to testify before the House, robbing the lower chamber of testimony that could have shed more light on the administration’s contacts with Ukraine. Democrats chose to vote to advance the articles instead of going to court to try to enforce the subpoenas for testimony and documents.