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FBI visits congressional candidate Robert Hyde's home, business

The FBI visited the home and business of Connecticut congressional candidate Robert Hyde early Thursday just days after he became the latest figure embroiled in the Ukraine scandal, news reports said.

A senior law enforcement official confirmed to NBC News and CNN that investigators visited Hyde’s home in Weatogue and his landscaping business in Avon, which also serves as headquarters for his House campaign, in the wake of the released texts that suggested Hyde was monitoring former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie YovanovitchMarie YovanovitchWhy it's time for a majority female Cabinet Giuliani associate Correia pleads guilty to making false statements Teenager who filmed George Floyd's death to be honored MORE.

Authorities reportedly did not answer CNN’s questions about the candidate’s location and reasons they wanted to talk to him. 

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A spokesperson for the FBI field office in New Haven, Conn., confirmed to The Hill that the FBI visited Hyde's residence and business earlier Thursday.

"There is no further information that can be shared at this time," the spokesperson said.

Hyde’s messages were revealed in a chunk of evidence provided by Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiJake Tapper jokes he's retained Giuliani to look into fraud in 'Sexiest Man' election Pioneering New York City Mayor David Dinkins dies at 93 Trump transition order follows chorus of GOP criticism MORE’s associate Lev Parnas to the House for the impeachment investigation. The congressional candidate aiming to unseat Rep. Jahana HayesJahana HayesFive House Democrats who could join Biden Cabinet GOP Rep. Dan Newhouse tests positive for COVID-19 Colorado Democrat Ed Perlmutter tests positive for coronavirus MORE (D) had written “they will let me know when she is on the move” and detailed the ambassador’s locations and security levels. 

The congressional candidate has told NBC News that he was drunk when he sent the message. 

Parnas, who was indicted on campaign law violations in October, described Hyde in his Wednesday interview with Rachel MaddowRachel Anne MaddowQuarantined Maddow shares story of partner who is fighting COVID-19: 'Don't get this thing' The tribal journalism of cable news is at a crossroads MSNBC's Joy Reid: Close presidential race shows 'great amount of racism and anti blackness' in US MORE as a “weird” character and said he doubted that he was actually tracking the ambassador. 

"Well, I don't believe it's true," Parnas said. "I think he was either drunk or he was trying to make himself bigger than he was, so I didn't take it seriously."