Poll: 51 percent of Americans say Senate should convict and remove Trump

A majority of Americans say that the Senate should vote to convict and remove President TrumpDonald John TrumpCDC updates website to remove dosage guidance on drug touted by Trump Trump says he'd like economy to reopen 'with a big bang' but acknowledges it may be limited Graham backs Trump, vows no money for WHO in next funding bill MORE, according to a new CNN poll conducted by SSRS

The survey, which was released on Monday, a day before the Senate impeachment trial convenes, found that 51 percent of Americans are in support of the Senate voting to convict and remove Trump. Forty-five percent of respondents said the Senate should vote against conviction and 4 percent said they had no opinion. 

Opinions on Senate removal divide strongly along party lines, with 89 percent of Democrats endorsing conviction and removal and 89 percent of Republicans saying they oppose it. Forty-eight percent of independent respondents said the Senate should vote to convict Trump, while 46 percent said they should not. 

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Meanwhile, 69 percent of respondents said that the impeachment trial should include testimony from witnesses who did not testify amid the House impeachment inquiry. Just 26 percent of respondents said that the trial should not include new witnesses. Republicans were divided on the issue with 48 percent saying the trial should include new witnesses. 

The survey also found that a majority of Americans — 58 percent — believe Trump abused the power of the presidency to obtain an improper personal political benefit. Fifty-seven percent of respondents also said that it was "true" that Trump obstructed the House impeachment inquiry by defying lawful requests from Congress for testimony and evidence. 

CNN noted that poll is the first national telephone survey conducted since the articles of impeachment were formally transferred from the House to the upper chamber. The survey was also conducted in the days after Lev Parnas, an associate of Trump's attorney Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump: Tough times but progress being made Giuliani touts experimental coronavirus treatment in private conversations with Trump Trump team picks fight with Twitter, TV networks over political speech MORE, claimed that Trump knew everything about the pressure campaign on Ukraine. 

The House in December voted to impeach Trump of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, making him just the third sitting president to face Senate removal. The vote took place following an inquiry into allegations that Trump used military aid and a White House meeting as a source of leverage in his push to get Ukraine to open politically beneficial investigations. 

House Democrats and the president's impeachment defense team released briefs arguing their case over the weekend. Democrats argued that the evidence gathered establishes that Trump is an "immediate threat to the Nation and the rule of law." Trump's lawyers, meanwhile, argued that the impeachment articles are “invalid on their face” because neither one is codified as a federal crime.

The CNN poll was conducted from Jan. 16-19 among a a random national population of 1,156 adults. It has a margin of error of 3.4 percent.