Trump questions why NPR exists after Pompeo clashes with reporter

President TrumpDonald John TrumpComey responds to Trump with Mariah Carey gif: 'Why are you so obsessed with me?' Congress to get election security briefing next month amid Intel drama New York man accused of making death threats against Schumer, Schiff MORE questioned why NPR exists following his secretary of State’s reportedly heated clash with one of the media organization's reporters.

The president on Sunday retweeted conservative radio host Mark LevinMark Reed LevinScalise after Democrat asks for examples of Sanders supporters 'being bad': 'I can think of an example' Loeffler works to gain traction with conservatives amid Collins primary bid Trump questions why NPR exists after Pompeo clashes with reporter MORE’s tweet that asked, “Why does NPR still exist?”

“A very good question!” Trump posted with Levin’s tweet. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Levin inquired about the publicly funded but privately owned national radio station, saying there are “thousands” of radio stations in the country and satellite radio.

“Why are we paying for this big-government, Democrat Party propaganda operation,” Levin wrote. 

NPR’s Mary Louise Kelly reported Friday that Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Dem anxiety grows ahead of Super Tuesday Pompeo expects US-Taliban agreement to be signed on Feb. 29 The Hill's Morning Report — Sanders, Dems zero in on Super Tuesday MORE lashed out at her for asking about Ukraine, saying, “Do you think Americans care about Ukraine?” while using the F-word and asking her to point to Ukraine on a map. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Pompeo then accused Kelly of lying to him, alleging that the post-interview conversation was off the record and that the interview was supposed to focus on Iran. Kelly says she confirmed with Pompeo’s staff that Ukraine would also be on the docket.

"It is shameful that this reporter chose to violate the basic rules of journalism and decency," Pompeo said Saturday.

The secretary of State has come under criticism after Democrats alleged he did not fully protect former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine Marie YovanovitchMarie YovanovitchThe Hill's review of John Solomon's columns on Ukraine Democrats worried about Trump's growing strength Congress looks to strengthen hand in State Department following impeachment MORE when the president’s personal attorney Rudy GiulianiRudy GiulianiKerry responds to Trump accusation he violated Logan Act: 'Another presidential lie' Giuliani worked for Dominican Republic candidate amid Ukraine efforts: report Democratic senators ask DOJ watchdog to expand Giuliani probe MORE ran a smear campaign against her to get her removed. She was recalled from her position last year.

NPR has stood behind Kelly.