Trump set to confront his impeachment foes

After sitting impatiently on the sidelines for months, President TrumpDonald John TrumpMichael Flynn transcripts reveal plenty except crime or collusion 50 people arrested in Minneapolis as hundreds more National Guard troops deployed Missouri state lawmaker sparks backlash by tweeting 'looters deserve to be shot' MORE on Tuesday night will finally get a chance to address — face to face — the House Democrats who impeached him and the senators who will soon vote on whether to end his presidency.

It could prove to be an awkward State of the Union address.

Sitting just behind Trump, and elevated on the House dais during his speech, will be Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiPelosi calls Trump's decision to withdraw US from WHO 'an act of extraordinary senselessness' House Democrats unveil measure to condemn police brutality The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Khanna says President Trump threatening violence against US citizens; Trump terminating relationship with WHO MORE (D-Calif.), who initially resisted impeachment efforts before eventually signing off on them. Trump and Pelosi haven’t spoken since a contentious White House meeting in October when the two traded insults.

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Among those seated in front of the president will be House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffFlynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers MORE (D-Calif.) and his fellow impeachment managers, as well as Senate Democrats who will vote unsuccessfully to remove Trump from office less than 24 hours after his speech.

Trump and his team were hoping for acquittal over the weekend, before he delivered his third State of the Union address. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSchumer to GOP: Cancel 'conspiracy hearings' on origins of Russia probe Overnight Health Care: Trump says US 'terminating' relationship with WHO | Cuomo: NYC on track to start reopening week of June 8 | COVID-19 workplace complaints surge 10 things to know today about coronavirus MORE (R-Ky.), however, was forced to punt the final vote until Wednesday afternoon.

But some senators are nonetheless predicting Trump will take an early victory lap during Tuesday’s speech.

“I expect that he’s going to be over the top. I would be surprised if he wasn’t bombastic and self-congratulatory. I would be surprised if he didn’t take potshots at the press and Democrats and impeachment managers,” Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyMissouri state lawmaker sparks backlash by tweeting 'looters deserve to be shot' The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Khanna says President Trump threatening violence against US citizens; Trump terminating relationship with WHO Senators weigh traveling amid coronavirus ahead of Memorial Day MORE (D-Conn.) told reporters Monday during a break from the impeachment trial. “My expectations are so low these days that I’m expecting the worst.”

When Trump addresses the joint session of Congress, he’ll be standing in front of Republicans like Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDemocrats gear up to hit GOP senators on DACA OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump administration gives renewables more time to take advantage of tax credits | House Republicans introduce bill to speed mining projects for critical minerals | Watchdog faults EPA communications in contamination of NC river The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Unemployment claims now at 41 million with 2.1 million more added to rolls; Topeka mayor says cities don't have enough tests for minorities and homeless communities MORE (Maine) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyDemocrats broaden probe into firing of State Department watchdog Coronavirus and America's economic miracle Former Romney strategist joins anti-Trump Lincoln Project MORE (Utah), who both crossed the aisle in Democrats’ failed push to subpoena witnesses in the impeachment trial. Other Senate Republicans, including Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderSenate GOP chairman criticizes Trump withdrawal from WHO Trump: US 'terminating' relationship with WHO Soured on Fox, Trump may be seeking new propaganda outlet MORE (Tenn.) and Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioSchumer to GOP: Cancel 'conspiracy hearings' on origins of Russia probe Trump administration designates B of PPP funds for community lenders The Memo: Trump's Scarborough tweets unsettle his allies MORE (Fla.), have voiced concerns with Trump’s dealings with Ukraine but said voters — not the Senate — should decide whether to oust him from office.

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One thing most Republican lawmakers agree on: Trump should steer clear of any talk of impeachment during his prime-time address.

“It’s the State of the Union. I just think there’s no way you talk about [impeachment] and that not be the takeaway,” said Rubio, one of Trump’s presidential primary rivals during the 2016 campaign. “Talk about trade. Talk about the issues in the Middle East, Iran, Iraq, the agenda for the rest of this year … And if I were him, I’d also look back at the economic performance for the last couple of years.”

Some of the lawmakers who are vying for the chance to challenge Trump in November, including Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe battle of two Cubas Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Ro Khanna Democrats gear up to hit GOP senators on DACA MORE (I-Vt.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Memo: Trump ratchets up Twitter turmoil Hillicon Valley: Twitter flags Trump tweet for 'glorifying violence' | Cruz calls for criminal investigation into Twitter over alleged sanctions violations | Senators urge FTC to investigate TikTok child privacy issues Warren condemns 'horrific' Trump tweet on Minneapolis protests, other senators chime in MORE (D-Mass.) and Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharLiberal group asks Klobuchar to remove herself from VP consideration because of prosecutorial record Klobuchar on defense as Floyd death puts spotlight on record Officer involved in George Floyd death charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter MORE (D-Minn.), are expected to skip the address and instead hit the campaign trail in New Hampshire ahead of that state’s Feb. 11 primary.

But many Democrats who have dropped out of the 2020 race are expected to be on hand, namely Sens. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerWarren condemns 'horrific' Trump tweet on Minneapolis protests, other senators chime in Senate Dems press DOJ over coronavirus safety precautions in juvenile detention centers Senators ask DeVos to adjust FAFSA form due to the coronavirus pandemic MORE (N.J.), Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisThe Memo: Trump ratchets up Twitter turmoil Biden: 'More than one African American woman' being considered for VP Klobuchar on defense as Floyd death puts spotlight on record MORE (Calif.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandSenate Dems press DOJ over coronavirus safety precautions in juvenile detention centers Senate Democrat introduces bill to protect food supply It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process MORE (N.Y.) and Reps. Seth MoultonSeth MoultonThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Debruyne Says Global Response Platform Needed; Navarro Saw It Coming Asian American lawmaker warns of fear of racism over coronavirus stigma Pressley experiencing flu-like symptoms, being tested for COVID-19 MORE (Mass.), Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanCongress must fill the leadership void Pelosi pushes to unite party on coronavirus bill despite grumbling from left Democrats rally behind monthly ,000 relief checks MORE (Ohio) and Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellGloves come off as Democrats fight for House seat in California Grenell says intelligence community working to declassify Flynn-Kislyak transcripts The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump visits a ventilator plant in a battleground state MORE (Calif.).

On Monday, Swalwell blasted Trump on Twitter as a “self-centered man-child” after a video showed the president gesturing to guests and pretending to conduct a band as the national anthem played at his Super Bowl party.

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Nearly all of the seven Democratic impeachment managers — Schiff and Reps. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesGun control group rolls out House endorsements Pelosi: George Floyd death is 'a crime' Tara Reade's attorney asks Biden to authorize search of his Senate papers MORE (N.Y.), Zoe LofgrenZoe Ellen LofgrenThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation Hillicon Valley: Trump signs order targeting social media legal protections | House requests conference with Senate after FISA vote canceled | Minneapolis systems temporarily brought down by hackers House punts on FISA, votes to begin negotiations with Senate MORE (Calif.), Jason CrowJason CrowGun control group rolls out House endorsements Bipartisan House bill seeks to improve pandemic preparedness Human Rights Campaign rolls out congressional endorsements on Equality Act anniversary MORE (Colo.), Val DemingsValdez (Val) Venita DemingsBiden: 'More than one African American woman' being considered for VP Rep. Demings, former police chief, urges review of police practices after death of George Floyd Minneapolis erupts for third night as protests spread, Trump vows retaliation MORE (Fla.) and Sylvia GarciaSylvia GarciaThe Hill's 12:30 Report: House returns to DC for coronavirus relief Minority caucuses endorse Texas Afro-Latina for Congress Texas House Dems ask governor to issue stay-at-home order MORE (Texas) — have confirmed they will attend the Tuesday night address. But it’s unclear whether Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerHouse Democrats unveil measure to condemn police brutality House Democrats call on DOJ to investigate recent killings of unarmed black people  Gun control group rolls out House endorsements MORE (D-N.Y.) will be there; he is spending time with his wife, who is battling pancreatic cancer.

Trump’s address to Congress will come a day after the impeachment managers made their closing arguments in his Senate trial.

“When the president tries to coerce an ally to help him cheat in our elections and then covers it up, we must say enough. Enough,” Schiff said during his impassioned closing arguments to senators Monday. “He has betrayed our national security and he will do so again. He has compromised our elections and he will do so again. You will not change him. You cannot constrain him. He is who he is. Truth matters little to him. What is right matters even less, and decency matters not at all.”

“It matters to you. Truth matters to you. Right matters to you. You are decent. He is not who you are,” Schiff added.

A handful of Democratic lawmakers will be trying to send a message by not being in the room at all. At least three House Democrats — Reps. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenHouse members race to prepare for first-ever remote votes Frontier drops planned fees for social distancing on flights after criticism More resources for the Legal Services Corporation are needed as the pandemic continues MORE (Tenn.), Frederica WilsonFrederica Patricia WilsonHouse Democrats unveil measure to condemn police brutality Pelosi says George Floyd was 'murdered on TV' Pelosi: George Floyd death is 'a crime' MORE (Fla.) and Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerPass the Primary Care Enhancement Act Democrats introduce bill to include cannabis businesses in coronavirus relief Michelle Obama to promote absentee voting MORE (Ore.) — said they will boycott Trump’s speech, as they have since 2018.

“I will not be a witness to puffery and prevarication flowing while our Constitution and our laws are disrespectfully and dangerously flouted,” Cohen said.

Tuesday won’t be the first time lawmakers have boycotted a State of the Union address given by a president under the cloud of impeachment.

In 1999, several GOP lawmakers skipped President Clinton’s State of the Union address that occurred amid his impeachment trial. Notably, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee at the time was not in attendance due to health issues.

Clinton conspicuously made no mention of impeachment during his State of the Union address, instead choosing to focus on Social Security reform and his domestic policy agenda.

Democrats won’t have much recourse during the speech for responding to whatever Trump says, aside from their body language. But they’re hoping to send messages with their choice of guests in the public gallery overlooking the chamber and with their attire.

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Female Democratic lawmakers plan to wear white to show solidarity with women ahead of the 2020 election.

But at least a handful of lawmakers will be trying to make a gesture of bipartisanship. Members of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus said they will be wearing purple ties and sitting together.

Democrats will largely emphasize their guests in the gallery, who include constituents affected by prescription drug costs or gun violence.

Some plan to highlight other issues.

Rep. Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyDemocrats to probe Trump's replacement of top Transportation Dept. watchdog The Postal Service collapse that isn't happening Postal Service to review package fee policy: report MORE (D-Va.) announced Monday that he has invited Hatice Cengiz, the fiancée of Jamal Khashoggi, the Washington Post writer who was murdered at the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul in 2018.

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“Hatice’s courage to sit in the House Chamber Tuesday night should serve as a clarion call to the President that no matter how high it goes, Saudi Arabia must be held accountable for the murder of this loving father and fiancée, respected journalist, U.S. resident, my constituent, and reformer,” Connolly said in a statement.

Rep. Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierAir Force documents acknowledged 'persistent' racial bias in justice system HHS watchdog says actions should be free from political interference Five factors influencing when the House returns MORE (D-Calif.), meanwhile, is bringing Courtney Wild, a victim of the late financier and serial sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.

Speier has introduced a bill named after Wild aimed at preventing the type of light plea deal granted to Epstein.

“We are standing up for what is right and to ensure that those who continue to subvert the rule of law and those who fail to hold perpetrators responsible for their malign deeds will not succeed,” Speier said in a statement.

Olivia Beavers and Jordain Carney contributed.