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Ginsburg expresses hope amid a Senate she thinks is 'divided sharply'

Ginsburg expresses hope amid a Senate she thinks is 'divided sharply'
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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgBarrett starts fraught first week as Supreme Court faces fights over election, abortion rights Bitter fight over Barrett fuels calls to nix filibuster, expand court Barrett to use Supreme Court chambers previously used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg MORE on Friday said that she hopes that the current U.S. Senate, which she described as "divided sharply," can rediscover "true bipartisanship spirit."

Ginsburg made comments during an event where she received the World Peace & Liberty Award from the World Jurist Association and the World Law Foundation, CNN reported.

"The US Senate was once a model of civility, of good fellowship, readiness to compromise for the good of the public. Today it's divided sharply — but when I remember back to how it once was, I am hopeful," the 86-year-old justice said.

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Ginsberg's comments come after the Senate voted to acquit President TrumpDonald John TrumpGiuliani goes off on Fox Business host after she compares him to Christopher Steele Trump looks to shore up support in Nebraska NYT: Trump had 7 million in debt mostly tied to Chicago project forgiven MORE on Wednesday of charges of impeachment in a vote that was largely along party lines. Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Memo: Five reasons why Trump could upset the odds Will anyone from the left realize why Trump won — again? Ratings drop to 55M for final Trump-Biden debate MORE (R-Utah) was the only member of his party to join Democratic senators and vote to convict Trump on one charge — abuse of power. 

Romney did not vote to convict Trump on the second charge of impeachment: obstruction of Congress. 

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Throughout impeachment proceedings, Democrats and Republicans could often be seen digging their heels in on their respective views on the president's contacts with Ukraine, the issue at the center of the impeachment inquiry and trial, in addition to taking swipes at one another.

In December during the House vote to impeach the president, no Republicans voted for the articles of impeachment and only two Democrats voted against the articles. One of the Democrats who voted "no" was Rep. Jeff Van DrewJeff Van DrewThe Hill's Campaign Report: Trump to leave Walter Reed l Post-debate polls show Biden building big lead l Coronavirus concerns ahead of VP debate Democrat-turned-Republican Van Drew trails Amy Kennedy in New Jersey House race: poll The Hill's Campaign Report: 19 years since 9/11 | Dem rival to Marjorie Taylor Greene drops out | Collin Peterson faces fight of his career | Court delivers blow to ex-felon voting rights in Florida MORE (R - N.J.) who switched parties shortly afterward. 

The famously liberal-leaning judge also said that the Senate has suffered from "a loss of the willingness to listen to people with views other than one's own."

She added: "I am hopeful that people of goodwill in both of our parties will say, 'We have had enough of dysfunction. Let's work together for the good of all of the people who compose the nation.'"