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Kayleigh McEnany has voted by mail 11 times since 2010: report

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany, who has defended President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal watchdog accuses VOA parent company of wrongdoing under Trump appointee Lawsuit alleges 200K Georgia voters were wrongly purged from registration list Ivanka Trump gives deposition in lawsuit alleging misuse of inauguration funds MORE's attacks on mail-in voting, has voted by mail 11 times since 2010, the Tampa Bay Times reported Wednesday. 

McEnany's voting record reviewed by the newspaper indicated that the Florida native has voted by mail in every election she participated in since 2010. Like Trump, who is now a Florida resident, McEnany also voted by mail in the 2020 presidential primary election in March.

McEnany last week defended the president casting a mail-in vote while claiming without evidence that the practice is subject to rampant fraud, saying, Trump is the commander-in-chief, "which means he’s here in Washington. He’s unable to cast his vote down in Florida, his state of residence.”

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She also tweeted a thread about mail-in voting on Tuesday, with the caption, “Will the media, and @Twitter, acknowledge these real concerns with mass mail-in voting?”

The White House did not respond to a request for comment, but McEnany later weighed in via a pair of tweets, saying absentee voting specifically means "you’re absent from the jurisdiction or unable to vote in person."

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Florida allows voters to mail in their ballots for any reason.

Democrats and some Republican governors have sought to expand access to mail-in ballots amid the coronavirus pandemic, but Trump has pushed back on idea, saying voting by mail gives Democrats an unfair advantage and the process is full of fraud.

Trump's unsubstantiated claims on Tuesday resulted in Twitter's first use of a fact check on his tweets.

The unsubstantiated tweets that Twitter said had “potentially misleading information” were amended with a warning that linked to a data page saying “there is no evidence that mail-in ballots are linked to voter fraud.” 

Twitter also specifically contradicted Trump’s false claim that California would send mail-in ballots to “anyone living in the state” and pointed out that mail-in ballots are already used in Oregon, Utah and Nebraska.

Trump and his campaign reacted furiously to Twitter's fact check, with the president threatening to "strongly regulate, or close them down."

—Updated at 4:34 p.m.