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Barr echoes Trump's concerns about mail-in voting, says it could 'open the floodgates of potential fraud'

Attorney General William BarrBill BarrMajority of Republicans say 2020 election was invalid: poll Biden administration withdraws from Connecticut transgender athlete case Justice Department renews investigation into George Floyd's death: report MORE echoed concerns from President TrumpDonald TrumpSacha Baron Cohen calls out 'danger of lies, hate and conspiracies' in Golden Globes speech Sorkin uses Abbie Hoffman quote to condemn Capitol violence: Democracy is 'something you do' Ex-Trump aide Pierson planning run for Congress MORE over mail-in voting, saying the method could be particularly susceptible to fraud.

"The thing we have going for us, especially when there's intense division in the country, is that we have peaceful transfers of power and a way of resolving it is to have an election," Barr said in an interview that will air this Sunday on Fox News' "Sunday Morning Futures" with anchor Maria BartiromoMaria Sara BartiromoGaetz suggests DeSantis could run for president in 2024 if Trump is out of the picture Bartiromo, Pirro, Dobbs file to dismiss Smartmatic lawsuits Fox News labels .7B Smartmatic defamation suit 'meritless' in motion to dismiss MORE

"But when state governments start adopting these practices like mail-in ballots, that open the floodgates of potential fraud, then people's confidence in the outcome of the election is going to be undermined," he added.

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The remarks echoed comments from Trump, who has warned without evidence that mail-in voting will harm Republicans and lead to widespread fraud.

“MAIL-IN VOTING WILL LEAD TO MASSIVE FRAUD AND ABUSE. IT WILL ALSO LEAD TO THE END OF OUR GREAT REPUBLICAN PARTY. WE CAN NEVER LET THIS TRAGEDY BEFALL OUR NATION,” Trump tweeted last month. 

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Experts have said that fraud is slightly more common among mail-in ballots than other forms of voting, but widespread fraud is not an issue among all formats of voting.

Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin and Connecticut are all sending voters absentee ballot applications, and New Hampshire and Massachusetts have eased requirements for absentee voting. California Gov. Gavin NewsomGavin Newsom'SNL' envisions Fauci as game show host, giving winners vaccines More states follow California's lead on vehicle emissions standards On The Trail: Cuomo and Newsom — a story of two embattled governors MORE (D) also signed an executive order Friday to send every registered voter in California a mail-in ballot. 

The debate over voting by mail has been heightened after several primaries were marred by long lines and crowded polling stations, raising health concerns during the coronavirus outbreak.