Trump: GOP senators who don't embrace him will 'lose their elections'

President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governor Arkansas governor says it's 'disappointing' vaccinations have become 'political' Watch live: Trump attends rally in Phoenix MORE on Thursday warned that GOP Senate candidates who don't fully embrace him will lose their elections, a warning shot to some moderates who have kept their distance from the president.

Trump called into Maria BartiromoMaria Sara BartiromoGraham says he'd 'leave town' to stop .5T spending plan The Memo: Trump pours gas on tribalism with Jan. 6 rewrite Trump: Tech giants 'immune from so many different things, but they're not immune from the lawsuit' MORE's show on Fox Business Network, where he predicted Republicans would take back control of the House despite little polling to support that argument. But he acknowledged it may be more difficult for the GOP to maintain its slim majority in the Senate.

"We’re fighting very hard in the Senate. I’ll be honest, the Senate is tough," Trump said. "We have a couple of people that aren’t as supportive of Trump as they should be, and those people are going to lose their elections."

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"The ones that don’t support, and I’m just talking, take a look ... you have a few people that want to be cute, and those people are going to lose their elections," Trump added. "And that’s a problem for the Senate."

The president did not offer specific names of Republicans he felt were insufficiently supportive of him. But there are a number of GOP senators in tough reelection bids, including Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTransit funding, broadband holding up infrastructure deal The Hill's Morning Report - Infrastructure vote fails; partisan feud erupts over Jan. 6 panel Senate falling behind on infrastructure MORE (R-Maine), Cory GardnerCory GardnerEx-Sen. Cory Gardner joins lobbying firm Biden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms MORE (R-Colo.), Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstRepublicans focus tax hike opposition on capital gains change Biden signs bill to bolster crime victims fund GOP seeks to make Biden synonymous with inflation MORE (R-Iowa), Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallySchumer, Tim Scott lead as Senate fundraising pace heats up GOP group launches million ad campaign pressing Kelly on filibuster Democrats facing tough reelections back bipartisan infrastructure deal MORE (R-Ariz.) and Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisSenators hail 'historic changes' as competing proposals to tackle military sexual assault advance Bipartisan group says it's still on track after setback on Senate floor Overnight Defense: Military justice overhaul included in defense bill | Pentagon watchdog to review security of 'nuclear football' | Pentagon carries out first air strike in Somalia under Biden MORE (R-N.C.).

Collins, in particular, has maintained her distance from Trump, at times criticizing the president's behavior and rhetoric and saying she won't campaign against presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump hails Arizona Senate for audit at Phoenix rally, slams governor Republicans focus tax hike opposition on capital gains change Biden on hecklers: 'This is not a Trump rally. Let 'em holler' MORE.

The Washington Post first reported that Ernst and Sen. David Perdue's (R-Ga.) first batch of campaign ads featured no mention of the Trump, whose approval rating as president has rarely risen about the low 40 percent range and whose handling of the coronavirus pandemic has gotten even lower marks.

The president's comments on Thursday echoed his attacks on House candidates who lost their seats in the 2018 midterms, costing the GOP its majority. During a press conference the day after the vote, Trump called out defeated lawmakers by name and accused them of failing to campaign with him.