Meadows says Trump willing to sign $1.3 trillion coronavirus relief bill

White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsSouthwest Airlines, unions call for six-month extension of government aid Airline CEOs plead with Washington as layoffs loom Trump reacts to Ginsburg's death: 'An amazing woman who led an amazing life' MORE said Friday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpBubba Wallace to be driver of Michael Jordan, Denny Hamlin NASCAR team Graham: GOP will confirm Trump's Supreme Court nominee before the election Southwest Airlines, unions call for six-month extension of government aid MORE would sign a coronavirus relief package totaling $1.3 trillion, an increase over the $1.1 trillion proposed by Senate Republicans.

“The president right now is willing to sign something at $1.3 trillion,” Meadows told reporters at the White House, saying that the figure had been offered privately to Democrats. He had previously said the White House was willing to go “north” of $1 trillion but did not offer a precise figure.

He said, however, that Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump puts Supreme Court fight at center of Ohio rally CDC causes new storm by pulling coronavirus guidance Overnight Health Care: CDC pulls revised guidance on coronavirus | Government watchdog finds supply shortages are harming US response | As virus pummels US, Europe sees its own spike MORE (D-Calif.) has stood firm in her demand for a $2.2 trillion relief package. 

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Meadows and Pelosi spoke Thursday afternoon, resuming negotiations on the next coronavirus package that have been stalled for three weeks. Pelosi said Thursday that she offered Meadows a concession by proposing a $2.2 trillion bill, down from a $2.4 trillion offer earlier this month.

"We have said again and again that we're willing to come down and meet them in the middle — that would be $2.2 trillion — and when they're ready to do that, we'll be ready to discuss and negotiate the particulars," Pelosi told reporters in the Capitol following the phone call with Meadows.

The disagreements largely center over the amount in funding for enhanced unemployment insurance benefits and assistance for state and local governments.

Talks between Meadows, Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinShutdown clash looms after Democrats unveil spending bill Lawmakers fear voter backlash over failure to reach COVID-19 relief deal United Airlines, unions call for six-month extension of government aid MORE, Pelosi, and Senate Majority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerJacobin editor: Primarying Schumer would force him to fight Trump's SCOTUS nominee CNN's Toobin: Democrats are 'wimps' who won't 'have the guts' to add Supreme Court seats Republican senator says plans to confirm justice before election 'completely consistent with the precedent' MORE (D-N.Y.) broke down in early August, causing Trump to sign a spate of executive orders aimed at deferring the payroll tax, putting a federal pause on evictions and extending the lapsed enhanced unemployment benefits for a period of time.

Meadows on Friday said it is “incumbent on us to act,” placing the blame on Pelosi for holding up negotiations by not agreeing to a smaller relief package that would cover areas where they have agreement.

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“We not only need to help with enhanced unemployment but small businesses, aid to schools, making sure that daycare provisions are augmented in this unprecedented time,” he said.

In May, House Democrats approved a $3.4 trillion relief bill. Senate Republicans unveiled a $1.1 trillion counterproposal at the end of July, when negotiations on the fifth package kicked off.

—Jordain Carney contributed.