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Renewed focus on Trump's Supreme Court list after Ginsburg's death

President TrumpDonald John TrumpJudge rules to not release Russia probe documents over Trump tweets Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo Obama to campaign for Biden in Florida MORE’s list of potential Supreme Court nominees, released earlier this month, is being reassessed after the death of Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgDemocrats to boycott committee vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Mitt Romney did not vote for Trump in 2020 election The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett MORE on Friday left a vacancy that Trump and Senate Republicans could attempt to fill with a conservative replacement.

If successful, such a move could transform the Supreme Court from a fragile 5-4 conservative majority into a commanding 6-3 conservative supermajority with implications for everything from abortion rights to the Second Amendment.

Trump's original Supreme Court list, released in 2017, includes several individuals viewed as top contenders for the seat, including Amy Coney Barrett, a Trump appointee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit; Thomas Hardiman, a George W. Bush appointee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit; and Amul Thapar, a Trump appointee to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit.

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Sens. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonCotton mocks NY Times over claim of nonpartisanship, promises to submit op-eds as test Barrett fight puts focus on abortion in 2020 election COVID outbreak threatens GOP's Supreme Court plans MORE (R-Ark.), Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzQuinnipiac poll finds Biden, Trump tied in Texas China could cut our access to critical minerals at any time — here's why we need to act The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Goldman Sachs - Two weeks out, Trump attempts to rally the base MORE (R-Texas) and Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyJustice Department charges Google with illegally maintaining search monopoly Conservatives seize on New York Post story to push Section 230 reform Hillicon Valley: Trump refuses to condemn QAnon | Twitter revises its policy, lets users share disputed article | Google sees foreign cyber threats MORE (R-Mo.), as well as Noel Francisco, who departed as solicitor general in June, are among the names on Trump's additional list of candidates for the Supreme Court that was released Sept. 9. Hawley, however, swiftly tweeted that he has “no interest” in serving on the Supreme Court and looked forward to “ confirming constitutional conservatives” in the Senate.

The list also includes a handful of individuals who have served in the Trump administration or his White House, as well as Trump appointees to lower federal courts. It includes, for instance, Gregory Katsas, who served as deputy White House counsel before Trump chose him to serve on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit in September 2017.

Trump’s updated list included the following potential nominees to join the bench alongside his two other appointees, Gorsuch and Kavanaugh:

Bridget Bade, a Trump appointee to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Daniel Cameron, Republican attorney general of Kentucky

Paul Clement, former solicitor general under President George W. Bush

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Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.)

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas)

Stuart Kyle Duncan, a Trump appointee to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Steven Engel, currently the assistant attorney general for the Office of Legal Counsel

Noel Francisco, who recently stepped down as the U.S. solicitor general

Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.)

James Ho, a Trump appointee to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Gregory Katsas, who served as deputy White House counsel in the Trump administration before being tapped for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit

Barbara Lagoa, 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Christopher Landau, the U.S. ambassador to Mexico and former clerk for Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence ThomasClarence ThomasPlaintiff and defendant from Obergefell v. Hodges unite to oppose Barrett's confirmation The Senate should evoke RBG in its confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court's Pennsylvania mail ballot ruling tees up test for Barrett MORE

Carlos Muñiz, a justice of the Supreme Court of Florida

Martha Pacold, a Trump appointee to the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois

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Peter Phipps, a Trump appointee to the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Sarah Pitlyk, a Trump appointee to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri

Alison Jones Rushing, U.S. Circuit Judge of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

Kate Todd, former chief counsel for the litigation arm of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Lawrence VanDyke, a Trump appointee to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals

 

Updated: 11:07 a.m.