Trump argues full Supreme Court needed to settle potential election disputes

Trump argues full Supreme Court needed to settle potential election disputes
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President TrumpDonald TrumpMan sentenced to nearly four years for running scam Trump, Biden PACs Meadows says Trump's blood oxygen level was dangerously low when he had COVID-19 Trump endorses David Perdue in Georgia's governor race MORE argued Tuesday that his forthcoming nominee to the Supreme Court should receive a vote before the November election so that the high court will have nine justices to resolve election-related disputes. 

“We need nine justices. You need that with the unsolicited millions of ballots that they’re sending. It’s a scam,” Trump told reporters on the South Lawn of the White House. “It’s a hoax. Everybody knows that, and the Democrats know it better than anybody else. So you’re going to need nine justices up there. I think it’s going to be very important because what they’re doing is a hoax with the ballots.” 

“Doing it before the election would be a very good thing because you’re going to probably see it because what they’re trying to do is sow confusion and everything else,” Trump continued. 

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Trump has repeatedly made dubious claims about expanded mail-in voting inviting substantial fraud into the election. Experts say that there is not evidence of meaningful fraud in mail-in voting. Trump’s critics view it as an effort to cast doubt on the results of the election should he lose; Trump has also falsely claimed that the only way he will lose the election is if it is “rigged.”  

Other Republicans have advanced similar arguments in pushing for Trump’s nominee, whom he plans to announce Saturday, to receive a swift vote before Election Day. In a contentious interview on ABC News this weekend, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzGOP senators introduce bill targeting Palestinian 'martyr payments' Bob Dole: heroic, prickly and effective Democrats see Christmas goal slipping away MORE (R-Fla.) suggested that Democrats could challenge the election results if Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenMan sentenced to nearly four years for running scam Trump, Biden PACs Dole in final column: 'Too many of us have sacrificed too much' Meadows says Trump's blood oxygen level was dangerously low when he had COVID-19 MORE does not win. 

“We need a full court on Election Day given the very high likelihood that we’re going to see litigation that goes to the court. We need a Supreme Court that can give a definitive answer for the country,” Cruz said. 

Vice President Pence likewise raised the prospect of the Supreme Court having to weigh in on election-related issues in an interview on Fox Business on Tuesday afternoon. 

“With all the talk about universal, unsolicited mail-in balloting, where we see states around the country extending the deadline, there is a possibility that election issues may come before the Supreme Court in the days following the election,” Pence told Fox host Lou DobbsLouis (Lou) Carl DobbsFormer Trump press aide: We went to Fox News 'to get what we wanted out' Court sets Smartmatic dismissal date on Giuliani, Bartiromo, others Fox News says Smartmatic lawsuit should be dismissed MORE

Trump said Tuesday he would announce his nominee to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader Ginsburg Women of Leadership Award given to Queen Elizabeth What's that you smell in the Supreme Court? The Memo: Trump's justices look set to restrict abortion MORE on Saturday. Republicans have not yet set out a clear timeline for the confirmation proceedings, but Trump has made clear that he wants a vote before the election, which is six weeks away. 

Most Republicans have lined up behind Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDole in final column: 'Too many of us have sacrificed too much' Schumer steps on the gas to move Biden agenda Hoyer says Dec. 15 is drop-dead deadline to hike debt ceiling MORE (R-Ky.) in moving forward with confirmation proceedings for Trump’s nominee, though at least two GOP senators oppose voting on the nomination before the election.

Democrats argue that the next president should nominate someone to fill the vacancy, pointing to Republicans’ decision not to hold a vote on then-President Obama’s nominee Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandFamily asks for better treatment for Maxwell as trial stretches on DOJ sues over Texas's redistricting plan Juan Williams: GOP infighting is a gift for Democrats MORE in 2016.