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McEnany calls chants against Trump 'appalling'

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said that protesters’ chants at President TrumpDonald John TrumpGiuliani goes off on Fox Business host after she compares him to Christopher Steele Trump looks to shore up support in Nebraska NYT: Trump had 7 million in debt mostly tied to Chicago project forgiven MORE when he visited the Supreme Court on Thursday to pay respects to Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgBarrett starts fraught first week as Supreme Court faces fights over election, abortion rights Bitter fight over Barrett fuels calls to nix filibuster, expand court Barrett to use Supreme Court chambers previously used by Ruth Bader Ginsburg MORE, who died Friday, were “appalling” and “disrespectful.” 

“The chants were appalling but certainly to be expected when you’re in the heart of the swamp,” McEnany told reporters at an afternoon press briefing.

McEnany said that she takes no issue with Americans peacefully demonstrating and chanting at the president, but she described the chants Thursday as a sign of disrespect. 

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“Everyone has a First Amendment in this country, but I thought it was an appalling and disrespectful thing to do as the president honored Justice Ginsburg,” McEnany told reporters. 

Trump and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpThe Hill's Campaign Report: One week from Election Day | Biden looks to expand map | Trump trails narrowly in Florida, Arizona Melania Trump focuses on coronavirus in return to campaign trail Watch live: Melania Trump holds MAGA event MORE visited the Supreme Court Thursday morning to view Ginsburg’s casket, which is being displayed atop the court steps. 

As the two stood silently before the casket, groups of people around the court loudly booed and shouted “vote him out” and “honor her wish” — the latter an apparent reference to Ginsburg reportedly telling her granddaughter that her final wish was for the next president to fill her vacancy. 

Trump is expected to announce his nominee to replace Ginsburg on Saturday, and Republican senators are making plans to confirm Trump's pick before the election — after they refused to give a hearing to a nominee from President Obama in 2016 for eight months before that year's election. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBitter fight over Barrett fuels calls to nix filibuster, expand court Trump blasts Obama speech for Biden as 'fake' after Obama hits Trump's tax payments White House hoping for COVID-19 relief deal 'within weeks': spokeswoman MORE (R-Ky.) argues the situations are different because the Senate is held by a majority of the sitting president's party in this case. 

McEnany separately insisted Thursday that precedent was on the White House’s side, claiming there are  29 previous instances in which a nomination was made in an election year.