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McEnany calls chants against Trump 'appalling'

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany said that protesters’ chants at President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden campaign slams Facebook after thousands of ads blocked by platform's pre-election blackout Mnuchin says he learned of Pelosi's letter to him about stimulus talks 'in the press' Harris to travel to Texas Friday after polls show tie between Trump, Biden MORE when he visited the Supreme Court on Thursday to pay respects to Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgHow recent Supreme Court rulings will impact three battleground states The false promise and real danger of Barrett's originalism Girl Scouts spark backlash from left after congratulating Justice Amy Coney Barrett MORE, who died Friday, were “appalling” and “disrespectful.” 

“The chants were appalling but certainly to be expected when you’re in the heart of the swamp,” McEnany told reporters at an afternoon press briefing.

McEnany said that she takes no issue with Americans peacefully demonstrating and chanting at the president, but she described the chants Thursday as a sign of disrespect. 

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“Everyone has a First Amendment in this country, but I thought it was an appalling and disrespectful thing to do as the president honored Justice Ginsburg,” McEnany told reporters. 

Trump and first lady Melania TrumpMelania TrumpSchumer calls Trump 'a moron' over coronavirus response Melania Trump gives rally remarks in rare joint appearance with the president The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Election night could be a bit messy MORE visited the Supreme Court Thursday morning to view Ginsburg’s casket, which is being displayed atop the court steps. 

As the two stood silently before the casket, groups of people around the court loudly booed and shouted “vote him out” and “honor her wish” — the latter an apparent reference to Ginsburg reportedly telling her granddaughter that her final wish was for the next president to fill her vacancy. 

Trump is expected to announce his nominee to replace Ginsburg on Saturday, and Republican senators are making plans to confirm Trump's pick before the election — after they refused to give a hearing to a nominee from President Obama in 2016 for eight months before that year's election. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMnuchin says he learned of Pelosi's letter to him about stimulus talks 'in the press' On The Money: Trump makes a late pitch on the economy | US economy records record GDP gains after historic COVID-19 drop | Pelosi eyes big COVID-19 deal in lame duck Lawmakers say infrastructure efforts are falling victim to deepening partisan divide MORE (R-Ky.) argues the situations are different because the Senate is held by a majority of the sitting president's party in this case. 

McEnany separately insisted Thursday that precedent was on the White House’s side, claiming there are  29 previous instances in which a nomination was made in an election year.