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Eric Trump claims his father 'literally saved Christianity'

President TrumpDonald TrumpFreedom Caucus member condemns GOP group pushing 'Anglo-Saxon political traditions' MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell's new free speech site to ban certain curse words Secret Facebook groups of special operations officers include racist comments, QAnon posts: report MORE’s son Eric TrumpEric TrumpHunter Biden blasts Trump in new book: 'A vile man with a vile mission' Sunday shows preview: Spotlight on Georgia voting law; lawmakers tackle gun violence, border surge Chicago hospital exec resigns after improper Trump Tower vaccine distribution MORE claimed that his father “literally saved Christianity” when touting the commander in chief’s accomplishments during a recent interview on a North Dakota radio show.

“He’s literally saved Christianity,” Eric Trump told “What’s on Your Mind” host Scott Hennen in remarks first highlighted by CNN. “I mean, there’s a full out war on faith in this country by the other side.”

“The Democratic Party, the far left, has become the party of the ‘atheists,’ and they want to attack Christianity, they want to close churches, they’re totally fine keeping liquor stores open,” he said, referring to COVID-19 orders by governors in some states labeling liquor stores as “essential” businesses, while also putting limitations on the number of people allowed in houses of worship.

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In May, President Trump called on governors to “do the right thing and allow these very important essential places of faith to open right now.”

However, public health experts have warned that places of worship tend to be more prone to becoming sources of COVID-19 infections if social distancing guidelines are not properly implemented.

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"You have to be careful, it depends on the particular state, city, region, county that you're in, and what the dynamics of the outbreak are," Anthony FauciAnthony FauciOvernight Health: NIH reverses Trump's ban on fetal tissue research | Biden investing .7B to fight virus variants | CDC panel to meet again Friday on J&J Fox News's Bret Baier posts vaccination selfie The Hill's 12:30 Report: Nearly half of U.S. adults partially or fully vaccinated MORE, the country’s top infectious diseases expert, told The Hill at the time.

Trump has gained support from many evangelical leaders for his promise to appoint conservative justices to the Supreme Court, which Trump has acted on most recently with the nomination of Judge Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettDemocratic Rep. Mondaire Jones calls on Breyer to retire Democrats roll out legislation to expand Supreme Court Pelosi says she won't bring bill to expand Supreme Court to the floor MORE to fill the seat left vacant by the death of Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgDemocratic Rep. Mondaire Jones calls on Breyer to retire Democrats roll out legislation to expand Supreme Court Pelosi rips McConnell in new book: He's an 'enabler of some of the worst stuff' MORE.

According to reports from the Pew Research Center, white evangelical voters are more than twice as likely to say Trump is religious. The same study, however, found that fewer than half of Americans overall think Trump is a Christian.

Despite Trump’s public praise of conservative Christian leaders, The Atlantic reported last week that Trump had allegedly called evangelical pastors “hustlers” in a 2015 conversation with his then-lawyer Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenTrump Organization adds veteran criminal defense attorney Manhattan DA investigating Trump says he won't seek reelection John Dean: 'Only a matter of how many days' until Trump is indicted MORE

Former aides also told the magazine that they heard the president mock conservative religious leaders, adding that he saw them as a group to be “schmoozed, conned or bought off,” according to The Atlantic.