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Eric Trump claims his father 'literally saved Christianity'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpFederal watchdog accuses VOA parent company of wrongdoing under Trump appointee Lawsuit alleges 200K Georgia voters were wrongly purged from registration list Ivanka Trump gives deposition in lawsuit alleging misuse of inauguration funds MORE’s son Eric TrumpEric Frederick TrumpTrump has discussed possible pardons for three eldest children, Kushner: report Lara Trump mulling 2022 Senate run in North Carolina: report Juan Williams: Defeated Trump is in legal peril MORE claimed that his father “literally saved Christianity” when touting the commander in chief’s accomplishments during a recent interview on a North Dakota radio show.

“He’s literally saved Christianity,” Eric Trump told “What’s on Your Mind” host Scott Hennen in remarks first highlighted by CNN. “I mean, there’s a full out war on faith in this country by the other side.”

“The Democratic Party, the far left, has become the party of the ‘atheists,’ and they want to attack Christianity, they want to close churches, they’re totally fine keeping liquor stores open,” he said, referring to COVID-19 orders by governors in some states labeling liquor stores as “essential” businesses, while also putting limitations on the number of people allowed in houses of worship.

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In May, President Trump called on governors to “do the right thing and allow these very important essential places of faith to open right now.”

However, public health experts have warned that places of worship tend to be more prone to becoming sources of COVID-19 infections if social distancing guidelines are not properly implemented.

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"You have to be careful, it depends on the particular state, city, region, county that you're in, and what the dynamics of the outbreak are," Anthony FauciAnthony FauciPompeo to host indoor holiday parties at State Department despite warning to employees to hold some missions virtually Obama says he may take coronavirus vaccine on TV to build trust in it McEnany hits Democratic leaders for not following their own COVID-19 restrictions MORE, the country’s top infectious diseases expert, told The Hill at the time.

Trump has gained support from many evangelical leaders for his promise to appoint conservative justices to the Supreme Court, which Trump has acted on most recently with the nomination of Judge Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettPompeo to host indoor holiday parties at State Department despite warning to employees to hold some missions virtually McEnany hits Democratic leaders for not following their own COVID-19 restrictions Cuomo likens COVID-19 to the Grinch: 'The season of viral transmission' MORE to fill the seat left vacant by the death of Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgCuomo likens COVID-19 to the Grinch: 'The season of viral transmission' For Thanksgiving, the Supreme Court upholds religious liberty Cardinal Dolan hails Supreme Court decision on churches, COVID-19 MORE.

According to reports from the Pew Research Center, white evangelical voters are more than twice as likely to say Trump is religious. The same study, however, found that fewer than half of Americans overall think Trump is a Christian.

Despite Trump’s public praise of conservative Christian leaders, The Atlantic reported last week that Trump had allegedly called evangelical pastors “hustlers” in a 2015 conversation with his then-lawyer Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenFor the Trump-haters, everything is a crime Talk of self-pardon for Trump heats up Ousted federal prosecutor hired by New York law firm MORE

Former aides also told the magazine that they heard the president mock conservative religious leaders, adding that he saw them as a group to be “schmoozed, conned or bought off,” according to The Atlantic.