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Trump refuses to disavow QAnon

President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE on Thursday refused to disavow QAnon during an NBC News town hall, saying he knows nothing about it beyond that supporters of the theory are “strongly against pedophilia.”

Trump was asked by host Savannah Guthrie to disavow the conspiracy theory, after she described it as a theory about Democrats being a satanic pedophile ring.

“I know nothing about QAnon. I know very little,” Trump said. “You told me but what you tell me doesn’t necessarily make it fact. I hate to say that.”

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"I know nothing about it. I do know they are very much against pedophilia, they fight it very hard. But I know nothing about it,” Trump continued.

When Guthrie noted that Sen. Ben SasseBen SasseJuan Williams: Let America be America Kremlin: US statements about pro-Navalny protests show 'direct support for the violation of the law' Senators spar over validity of Trump impeachment trial MORE (R-Neb.) said QAnon is “nuts” and that “real leaders call conspiracy theories conspiracy theories,” Trump again said he has no knowledge about the theory.

“He may be right. I just don’t know about QAnon,” Trump said. 

As Guthrie continued to press him, Trump replied: "Let me just tell you what I do hear about, it is they are very strongly against pedophilia and I agree with that. I do agree with that very strongly." 

QAnon is a far-right conspiracy theory whose followers believe that an underground cabal of satanic worshipers run child sex trafficking rings and are in control of the so-called deep state government and that Trump is working to expose them.

The movement began on the internet but has grown substantially in recent months, garnering support even from some GOP congressional candidates. The FBI designated the collection of individuals a domestic terror threat in 2019 because it had the potential to encourage violence.

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Trump has previously offered tepid support for the group, telling reporters at a news conference in August that he knew little about it but understands its supporters like him “very much” and “love America.”

Following Trump’s remarks then, Vice President Pence was pressed in a news interview on QAnon and said that he dismisses it “out of hand.”

Trump also tangled with Guthrie when she asked him why he had appeared hesitant at times to denounce white supremacy, including in the first presidential debate with Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenBudowsky: A Biden-McConnell state of emergency summit DC might win US House vote if it tries Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman inks deal with IMG Models MORE.