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Trump and advisers considering firing FBI director after election: WaPo

President TrumpDonald John TrumpAppeals court OKs White House diverting military funding to border wall construction Pentagon: Tentative meeting between spy agencies, Biden transition set for early next week Conservative policy director calls Section 230 repeal an 'existential threat' for tech MORE has reportedly talked with his advisers about the possibility of firing FBI Director Christopher Wray after Election Day due to the president’s frustration that federal law enforcement officials have not delivered information that would help him politically in the final weeks before the election, people familiar with the matter told The Washington Post

According to the sources, discussions between the president and his senior aides have resulted from criticisms that Wray and Attorney General William BarrBill BarrKellyanne Conway acknowledges Biden as apparent winner Trump Pentagon nominee alleged Biden 'coup': report Ex-FBI lawyer who falsified document in Trump-Russia probe seeks to avoid prison MORE have not fulfilled Trump’s wish for an official investigation to be launched into Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenAppeals court OKs White House diverting military funding to border wall construction Federal student loan payment suspension extended another month Pentagon: Tentative meeting between spy agencies, Biden transition set for early next week MORE and his son Hunter Biden

The sources, who the Post said spoke on the condition of anonymity in order to freely disclose internal discussions, said Trump has indicated he wants actions similar to those made ahead of the 2016 election by FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Dem leaders back smaller COVID-19 relief bill as pandemic escalates Trump blasts special counsel Durham for moving too slowly Biden plans to keep Wray as FBI director: report MORE, who told Congress he had reopened an investigation into then-Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary and Chelsea Clinton to host series based on their book 'Gutsy Women' Democrats see spike in turnout among Asian American, Pacific Islander voters Biden officially announces ex-Obama official Brian Deese as top economic adviser MORE’s use of a private email server while she was secretary of State. 

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Polling data from 2016 showed that Comey’s announcement, which came just 11 days before the presidential election, significantly impacted Clinton’s lead over Trump heading into Election Day. 

The sources told the Post that Trump believes Wray was one of his worst personnel picks, and both White House chief of staff Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Congress inches closer to virus relief deal Alyssa Farah resigns as White House communications director Trump hits Barr over voter fraud remarks: 'He hasn't looked' MORE and top Trump adviser Dan Scavino have also criticized Wray in internal conversations. 

White House spokesman Judd DeereJudd DeerePa. lawmaker was informed of positive coronavirus test while meeting with Trump: report Trump set for precedent-breaking lame-duck period Trump administration revives talk of action on birthright citizenship MORE told the Post that the White House does not speculate on personnel matters, adding that “if the president doesn’t have confidence in someone he will let you know.” 

In their advocacy for an official investigation into the Bidens, Trump and his allies have recently used a New York Post article that alleged Hunter Biden helped broker a meeting between an executive at the Ukrainian gas firm Burisma and his father when Joe Biden was vice president. 

The story has since been disputed by Biden’s campaign, and outside intelligence experts have raised concerns about whether it could be part of a foreign disinformation campaign. 

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However, the FBI said in a letter sent Tuesday night to Senate Homeland Security Committee Chairman Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonWatch live: Senate panel holds Russia investigation hearing Republican frustration builds over Cabinet picks Grassley returns to Capitol after having coronavirus MORE (R-Wis.) that it had “nothing to add” to a statement made by Director of National Intelligence John RatcliffeJohn Lee RatcliffeHillicon Valley: Senate Intelligence Committee leaders warn of Chinese threats to national security | Biden says China must play by 'international norms' | House Democrats use Markup app for leadership contest voting Pompeo imposes visa restrictions on Chinese officials over 'intimidation' tactics Senate Intelligence Committee leaders warn of Chinese threats to national security MORE earlier this week in which he dismissed suspicions that the reports on Hunter Biden resulted from a Russian disinformation campaign. 

The FBI “can neither confirm nor deny the existence of any ongoing investigation or persons or entities under investigation, including to Members of Congress,” Tuesday’s letter from FBI Assistant Director Jill Tyson said. 

In recent weeks, Trump has continuously targeted Wray, whom Trump nominated in 2017, particularly after Wray contradicted the president’s assertions about potential fraud in mail-in ballots and his description of the group antifa. 

During last week’s NBC town hall, Trump argued that Wray is “not doing a very good job” after moderator Savannah Guthrie cited the FBI director’s comments that there is no evidence of widespread fraud in mail-in voting.

Trump has also recently levied criticisms against several other key members of his administration. Earlier this month, Trump expressed frustration at Barr and Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoPompeo imposes visa restrictions on Chinese officials over 'intimidation' tactics Israel's new Gulf relations give Biden's team a new Middle East hub Pompeo knocks Turkey in NATO speech: report MORE for what he described as a failure to implicate his political enemies in wrongdoing.

More recently, Trump criticized Treasury Secretary Steven MnuchinSteven Terner MnuchinThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Dem leaders back smaller COVID-19 relief bill as pandemic escalates Sweeping financial crimes bill to hitch a ride on defense measure On The Money: Funding bill hits snag as shutdown deadline looms | Pelosi, Schumer endorse 8 billion plan as basis for stimulus talks | Poll: Most Americans support raising taxes on those making at least 0K MORE for not delivering a result after weeks of coronavirus relief talks with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Unemployment gains lower than expected | Jobs report lights fire under coronavirus relief talks Hillicon Valley: Senate Intelligence Committee leaders warn of Chinese threats to national security | Biden says China must play by 'international norms' | House Democrats use Markup app for leadership contest voting Bipartisan governors call on Congress to pass coronavirus relief package MORE (D-Calif.).