Doug Jones seen as leading contender as Biden attorney general: report

Doug Jones seen as leading contender as Biden attorney general: report
© Greg Nash

Outgoing Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) has emerged as the No. 1 contender for President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenHouse clears bill to provide veterans with cost-of-living adjustment On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default To reduce poverty, stop burdening the poor: What Joe Manchin gets wrong about the child tax credit MORE’s attorney general, according to NBC News, citing three sources familiar with the discussions.

Other contenders reportedly include former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesSally Yates: I never thought that I'd be saying, 'Yeah, go Liz Cheney' ABC lands first one-on-one TV interview with Garland since confirmation Appointing a credible, non-partisan Jan. 6 commission should not be difficult MORE and Judge Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandTexas sues Biden administration over guidance on transgender worker rights Barr-Durham investigation again fails to produce a main event Grassley calls for federal prosecutor to probe botched FBI Nassar investigation MORE, whom former President Obama nominated to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court in 2016. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP political operatives indicted over illegal campaign contribution from Russian national in 2016 McConnell privately urged GOP senators to oppose debt ceiling hike On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default MORE (R-Ky.) refused to hold hearings on Garland’s nomination.

Jones, first elected in 2017, was defeated in his 2020 bid for a full term by Sen.-elect Tommy Tuberville, former head football coach at Auburn University. His nomination would come almost exactly four years after President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump takes shot at new GOP candidate in Ohio over Cleveland nickname GOP political operatives indicted over illegal campaign contribution from Russian national in 2016 On The Money — Dems dare GOP to vote for shutdown, default MORE named then-Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsOvernight Hillicon Valley — Apple issues security update against spyware vulnerability Stanford professors ask DOJ to stop looking for Chinese spies at universities in US Overnight Energy & Environment — Democrats detail clean electricity program MORE, also from Alabama, to the position.

ADVERTISEMENT

Jones told NBC News he believed “it’s better not to make any comments” on whether he would accept the nomination if offered.

“They’ve got a process that they go through, and hopefully they'll wrap some of that up pretty soon,” he said. “We’ll see how it goes.”

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamRep. Tim Ryan becomes latest COVID-19 breakthrough case in Congress Graham found Trump election fraud arguments suitable for 'third grade': Woodward book Senate parliamentarian nixes Democrats' immigration plan MORE (R-S.C.), who has yet to acknowledge Biden as the winner of the election, also declined to comment on the possibility. Graham told NBC “we’ll talk about that after Dec. 14,” when the electoral college is scheduled to meet.

Jones was appointed U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama by then-President Clinton in 1997. During his tenure, he successfully prosecuted two former members of the Ku Klux Klan for the 1963 bombing that killed four Black girls in Birmingham’s 16th Street Baptist Church.

Biden and Jones also have a long relationship. The two worked together when Biden sat on the Senate Judiciary Committee and Jones was a prosecutor. Jones worked on Biden’s two previous presidential campaigns in 1988 and 2008. Biden would later campaign for Jones in the 2017 special election, one of few national Democratic figures to visit the historically conservative state during the cycle.