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Doug Jones seen as leading contender as Biden attorney general: report

Doug Jones seen as leading contender as Biden attorney general: report
© Greg Nash

Outgoing Sen. Doug Jones (D-Ala.) has emerged as the No. 1 contender for President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenCNN: Bidens' dogs removed from the White House Federal judge rules 'QAnon shaman' too dangerous to be released from jail Pelosi says Capitol riot was one of the most difficult moments of her career MORE’s attorney general, according to NBC News, citing three sources familiar with the discussions.

Other contenders reportedly include former Deputy Attorney General Sally YatesSally Caroline YatesBiden directs DOJ to phase out use of private prisons The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from chaotic downtown DC Biden to name Merrick Garland for attorney general MORE and Judge Merrick GarlandMerrick GarlandThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Johns Hopkins University - CDC announces long-awaited guidelines for fully vaccinated Americans The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the National Shooting Sports Foundation - Relief bill to become law; Cuomo in trouble This week: Congress set to send .9 trillion coronavirus bill to Biden MORE, whom former President Obama nominated to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court in 2016. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump ramps up battle with Republican leadership RNC fires back at Trump, says it 'has every right' to use his name in fundraising appeals Blunt retirement shakes up Missouri Senate race MORE (R-Ky.) refused to hold hearings on Garland’s nomination.

Jones, first elected in 2017, was defeated in his 2020 bid for a full term by Sen.-elect Tommy Tuberville, former head football coach at Auburn University. His nomination would come almost exactly four years after President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump vows 'No more money for RINOS,' instead encouraging donations to his PAC Federal judge rules 'QAnon shaman' too dangerous to be released from jail Pelosi says Capitol riot was one of the most difficult moments of her career MORE named then-Sen. Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTanden withdraws nomination as Biden budget chief Manchin flexes muscle in 50-50 Senate Udalls: Haaland criticism motivated 'by something other than her record' MORE, also from Alabama, to the position.

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Jones told NBC News he believed “it’s better not to make any comments” on whether he would accept the nomination if offered.

“They’ve got a process that they go through, and hopefully they'll wrap some of that up pretty soon,” he said. “We’ll see how it goes.”

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: Trump can make GOP bigger, stronger, or he 'could destroy it' Sunday shows preview: Manchin makes the rounds after pivotal role in coronavirus relief debate Georgia DA investigating Trump taps racketeering expert for probe: report MORE (R-S.C.), who has yet to acknowledge Biden as the winner of the election, also declined to comment on the possibility. Graham told NBC “we’ll talk about that after Dec. 14,” when the electoral college is scheduled to meet.

Jones was appointed U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama by then-President Clinton in 1997. During his tenure, he successfully prosecuted two former members of the Ku Klux Klan for the 1963 bombing that killed four Black girls in Birmingham’s 16th Street Baptist Church.

Biden and Jones also have a long relationship. The two worked together when Biden sat on the Senate Judiciary Committee and Jones was a prosecutor. Jones worked on Biden’s two previous presidential campaigns in 1988 and 2008. Biden would later campaign for Jones in the 2017 special election, one of few national Democratic figures to visit the historically conservative state during the cycle.