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Trump says election challenges 'not over'

President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE said in an interview broadcast early Sunday that his attempts to overturn the vote are “not over.”

In the “Fox & Friends Weekend” interview recorded Saturday, Brian Kilmeade asked the president whether his challenges to the election results were “over” after the Supreme Court on Friday rejected a Texas lawsuit seeking to toss the results in four states.

“No, it’s not over. We keep going. And we’re going to continue to go forward,” the president replied.

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Trump also continued his broadsides against Georgia Gov. Brian KempBrian KempTrump establishes 'Office of the Former President' in Florida A better response to political violence in America Refreshing the tree of liberty MORE (R) for refusing to overturn President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenBudowsky: A Biden-McConnell state of emergency summit DC might win US House vote if it tries Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman inks deal with IMG Models MORE’s victory in the state, accusing him of harming Sens. Kelly LoefflerKelly LoefflerLimbaugh falsely says Biden didn't win legitimately while reacting to inauguration Suburbs pose challenge for GOP in post-Trump era Democrats swear in three senators to gain majority MORE (R-Ga.) and David PerdueDavid PerdueSuburbs pose challenge for GOP in post-Trump era Democrats swear in three senators to gain majority Schumer becomes new Senate majority leader MORE (R-Ga.) in their upcoming Jan. 5 runoffs, which will determine control of the Senate.

“We have a governor, Republican governor, that’s worse than a Democrat. He’s terrible, and he’s hurting Kelly and David very badly, the senators that are terrific people,” Trump added.

Kilmeade went on to ask how Monday's meeting of the Electoral College, which is expected to elect Biden as the next president, and Congress's count of its votes on Jan. 6 would affect Trump’s efforts. 

“I don’t know. We’re going to speed it up as much as we can. But you can only go so fast. They give us very little time,” Trump said, going on to repeat conspiracy theories about widespread voter fraud. Experts, local officials and Attorney General William BarrBill BarrPoll finds 1 in 3 believe false claims voter fraud led to Biden win Trump pressed DOJ to go to Supreme Court in bid to overturn election: report Budowsky: Democracy won, Trump lost, President Biden inaugurated MORE have all said there is no indication of widespread fraud in the 2020 election.

Asked by Kilmeade if his legal team had proved election fraud, the president responded, "We never get a chance to prove it because a judge will say, 'Well, I’m sorry, you don’t have standing.'"

Kilmeade later challenged Trump on the lack of proof of widespread fraud, with Trump insisting that “we’ve proven it” without elaborating.

“But no judge has had the courage, including the Supreme Court. I am so disappointed in them. No judge, including the Supreme Court of the United States, has had the courage to allow it to be heard,” he added.