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Trump says White House staffers shouldn't be among first to get coronavirus vaccine

President TrumpDonald TrumpTrump State Department appointee arrested in connection with Capitol riot Intelligence community investigating links between lawmakers, Capitol rioters Michelle Obama slams 'partisan actions' to 'curtail access to ballot box' MORE said Sunday that White House staffers should not be among the first in the country to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

A White House official confirmed earlier Sunday a plan to prioritize for immunizations those working close to the president. The New York Times first reported the strategy

“People working in the White House should receive the vaccine somewhat later in the program, unless specifically necessary,” Trump posted on Twitter. “I have asked that this adjustment be made.”

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“I am not scheduled to take the vaccine, but look forward to doing so at the appropriate time,” he added.

National Security Council spokesman John Ullyot told The Hill in a statement earlier Sunday that, "Senior officials across all three branches of government will receive vaccinations pursuant to continuity of government protocols established in executive policy.”

“The American people should have confidence that they are receiving the same safe and effective vaccine as senior officials of the United States government on the advice of public health professionals and national security leadership," he added.

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Two sources had told the Times that the White House intends to prevent other government officials from getting infected with COVID-19, starting with the most senior staffers closest to Trump.

Previously, health officials have said the first doses of the vaccine would go to health care workers and high-risk populations such as older people. Pfizer-BioNTech began distribution of the first doses of its vaccine on Sunday, with more than 184,000 vials, each containing five doses, out for delivery.

COVID-19 has infected a confirmed more than 16.2 million people in the U.S., killing almost 300,000, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.