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Trump warns Cotton after senator says he won't object to Biden certification

President TrumpDonald TrumpSchumer: Impeachment trial will be quick, doesn't need a lot of witnesses Nurse to be tapped by Biden as acting surgeon general: report Schumer calls for Biden to declare climate emergency MORE on Monday targeted Sen. Tom CottonTom Bryant CottonGOP senator: Impeachment a 'moot point' after Trump's exit Sunday shows preview: All eyes on Biden administration to tackle coronavirus Senate approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee MORE (R-Ark.) a day after the senator said he would not join an effort to object to the certification of Electoral College votes affirming Joe BidenJoe BidenBudowsky: A Biden-McConnell state of emergency summit DC might win US House vote if it tries Inaugural poet Amanda Gorman inks deal with IMG Models MORE as the next president.

"How can you certify an election when the numbers being certified are verifiably WRONG,” Trump tweeted, suggesting he would falsely claim during his rally in Georgia on Monday night that he was a true winner of the election despite multiple audits and court cases confirming Biden had won and that Trump claims lacked standing.

"@SenTomCotton Republicans have pluses & minuses, but one thing is sure, THEY NEVER FORGET!” Trump added.

Cotton, who is widely considered a potential GOP presidential candidate for 2024, broke with roughly a dozen other Senate Republicans who have said they will object to the electoral results in certain states when Congress certifies the votes on Wednesday.

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Cotton warned that an effort spearheaded by Sens. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyTo 'lower the temperature' raise commitments to federalism Leahy, not Roberts, to preside over impeachment trial Beto O'Rourke: Ted Cruz 'guilty of sedition' in Capitol insurrection MORE (R-Mo.) and Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate to vote Tuesday on Biden's secretary of State pick To 'lower the temperature' raise commitments to federalism Leahy, not Roberts, to preside over impeachment trial MORE (R-Texas), two other potential 2024 White House hopefuls, to challenge the electoral votes of several swing states that went for President-elect Joe Biden could "establish unwise precedents."

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenators spar over validity of Trump impeachment trial Trump selects South Carolina lawyer for impeachment trial Democrats formally elect Harrison as new DNC chair MORE (R-S.C.), another staunch Trump ally, also balked at the effort led by Cruz and Hawley, calling it a "political dodge."

A handful of other Republicans have also criticized the plan to object to the results, saying it undermines the result of the election and gives Congress undue influence. But those GOP senators, including Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyHouse formally sends impeachment to Senate, putting Trump on trial for Capitol riot Bernie Sanders has been most-followed member of Congress on social media for six years The Hill's Morning Report - Biden: Focus on vaccine, virus, travel MORE (R-Utah) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsCollins: Minimum wage increase should be separate from COVID-19 relief package The Hill's Morning Report - Biden: Focus on vaccine, virus, travel Moderates vow to 'be a force' under Biden MORE (R-Maine), have largely been frequent Trump critics.

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A few other senators have expressed concern over audio of Trump's call to the Georgia secretary of state, where the president pressured him to "find" votes that would tip the state in Trump's favor.

Trump swiped at his critics within the GOP more broadly in a subsequent tweet on Monday morning, dubbing the group the "Surrender Caucus."

The 'Surrender Caucus' within the Republican Party will go down in infamy as weak and ineffective 'guardians' of our Nation, who were willing to accept the certification of fraudulent presidential numbers!" Trump tweeted.