Secret Service director sends memo reminding employees to remain nonpartisan amid 'hyper-charged rhetoric'

Secret Service director sends memo reminding employees to remain nonpartisan amid 'hyper-charged rhetoric'
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Secret Service Director James Murray sent an agency-wide memo on Wednesday reminding employees to remain nonpartisan amid the current "hyper-charged rhetoric" in the wake of last week's deadly Capitol riot.

The memo, which was reported by CNN, comes as the Secret Service begins implementing special security measures over concerns of more violence in the days leading up to President-elect Joe BidenJoe BidenRealClearPolitics reporter says Freedom Caucus shows how much GOP changed under Trump Iowa governor suggests immigrants partially to blame for rising COVID-19 cases Biden officials pledge to confront cybersecurity challenges head-on MORE's inauguration on Wednesday.

“There has been a great deal of hyper-charged rhetoric associated with the presidential transition, particularly on social media sites. As members of the Secret Service, each of us is expected to remain civil and professional at all times," Murray wrote, according to CNN.

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"When carrying out our duties and representing the agency, we are expected to behave in a nonpartisan manner.”

Murray added that the adjustments made for next Wednesday's inauguration will “simply provide additional time for the full resources of all participating agencies to be employed.” He goes on to say that the agency’s focus “must be sharp” as it executes its security strategy.

“I have tremendous faith and confidence that the women and men of the Secret Service will continue to perform at the highest level, ensuring a safe and secure inauguration and a peaceful transition of power,” Murray reportedly wrote.

A Secret Service spokesperson declined to comment on the memo to CNN, and the agency told The Hill that it does not comment on unofficially obtained internal documents or communications. 

The heightened concerns come after a mob of President TrumpDonald TrumpRealClearPolitics reporter says Freedom Caucus shows how much GOP changed under Trump Jake Ellzey defeats Trump-backed candidate in Texas House runoff DOJ declines to back Mo Brooks's defense against Swalwell's Capitol riot lawsuit MORE’s supporters breached the Capitol on Jan. 6. The violence left five people dead, including a Capitol Police officer, and dozens have been arrested and face federal charges, including several current and former members of the military and members of law enforcement from multiple states.

The FBI has warned of nationwide armed protests leading up to the inauguration, including potentially another at the Capitol, which has been fenced off and filled with National Guardsmen in the wake of last week's assault. The agency has also told police chiefs to keep sharing intelligence about possible future attacks.

Updated at 10:56 a.m.