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Al Gore lobbied Biden to not scale back climate plans in infrastructure deal

Al Gore lobbied Biden to not scale back climate plans in infrastructure deal
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Former Vice President Al GoreAlbert (Al) Arnold GoreOn The Money: Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle | White House rules out gas tax hike Democrats have turned solidly against gas tax Overnight Energy: Biden seeks to reassert US climate leadership | President to 'repeal or replace' Trump decision removing protections for Tongass | Administration proposes its first offshore wind lease sale MORE reportedly urged President BidenJoe BidenExpanding child tax credit could lift 4 million children out of poverty: analysis Maria Bartiromo defends reporting: 'Keep trashing me, I'll keep telling the truth' The Memo: The center strikes back MORE in private to keep climate-focused policies in his expansive infrastructure bill as he struggles to shore up GOP support for the bill.

Sources familiar with the situation told The Washington Post that Gore, an extremely prominent environmentalist, made the call to Biden last month after being encouraged to do so by former White House Chief of Staff John Podesta. During the call, Gore also asked Biden to block the planned Byhalia Pipeline, which transport crude oil through predominantly Black neighborhoods in Memphis and could potentially affect drinking water.

The former vice president also spoke to Biden aide Steve RicchettiSteve RicchettiThe Hill's Morning Report - After high-stakes Biden-Putin summit, what now? Democratic patience runs out on bipartisan talks Progressives threaten to block bipartisan infrastructure proposal MORE about climate and infrastructure, the Post reports.

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The private lobbying from Gore comes shortly before Biden is set to discuss measures to combat climate change at the Group of Seven summit in Cornwall, England this week. The G7 leaders are expected to announce new commitments to combating climate change, though Biden will be limited in what he can push for due to ongoing gridlock in D.C.

On Tuesday, Biden ended negotiations with a GOP group led by Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoOvernight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 COVID-19 long-haulers press Congress for paid family leave Senate confirms Radhika Fox to lead EPA's water office MORE (R-W.Va.), failing to reach an agreement after weeks of talks. Biden will instead be focusing on discussions between a bipartisan group of moderate senators, including Sens. Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaCentrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle Democrats scramble to unify before election bill brawl MORE (D-Ariz.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Sunday shows - Voting rights, infrastructure in the spotlight Manchin compromise proposal a 'federal takeover of the election system,' GOP senator says MORE (R-Ohio), Bill CassidyBill CassidyPortman: Republicans are 'absolutely' committed to bipartisan infrastructure bill Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Centrists gain leverage over progressives in Senate infrastructure battle MORE (R-La.) and Joe ManchinJoe ManchinThe Memo: The center strikes back Sunday shows - Voting rights, infrastructure in the spotlight Democratic clamor grows for select committee on Jan. 6 attack MORE (D-W.Va.)

On Thursday, the bipartisan group announced that they had reached an agreement on an infrastructure deal that invests $1.2 trillion over eight years.

“Our group — comprised of 10 senators, five from each party — has worked in good faith and reached a bipartisan agreement on a realistic, compromise framework to modernize our nation’s infrastructure and energy technologies,” the coalition said in a joint statement. "This investment would be fully paid for and not include tax increases.”