White House says it's 'closer to agreement than ever' after House punts infrastructure vote

White House says it's 'closer to agreement than ever' after House punts infrastructure vote
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The White House on Thursday said Democrats were "closer to an agreement than ever" after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiUS expected to announce diplomatic boycott of Beijing Olympics soon: report Pressure grows to remove Boebert from committees Lawmakers remember Bob Dole: 'Bona fide American hero' MORE (D-Calif.) was forced to abort a planned vote on a bipartisan infrastructure bill in the face of opposition from progressive members of the party.

"A great deal of progress has been made this week, and we are closer to an agreement than ever. But we are not there yet, and so, we will need some additional time to finish the work, starting tomorrow morning first thing," press secretary Jen PsakiJen PsakiUS expected to announce diplomatic boycott of Beijing Olympics soon: report Joe Biden: The Brian Williams presidency Biden plan for free at-home tests faces hurdles MORE said in a statement.

"While Democrats do have some differences, we share common goals of creating good union jobs, building a clean energy future, cutting taxes for working families and small businesses, helping to give those families breathing room on basic expenses—and doing it without adding to the deficit, by making those at the top pay their fair share," she added.

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House Democratic leaders late Thursday postponed a vote yet again on the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill amid threats from progressives to tank it as leverage for a separate, larger package that contains party priorities on health care, education and climate policies.

House progressives had vowed to oppose the bill without having more concrete assurances about the contours of a reconciliation bill.

Democratic leadership and the White House were hoping they could reach an agreement on a framework for the reconciliation bill that would convince House progressives to vote for the Senate-passed bipartisan infrastructure bill. 

White House officials, led by National Economic Council Director Brian DeeseBrian DeeseBiden says 'consumer spending has recovered' to pre-pandemic levels The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Arbery case, Biden spending bill each test views of justice Democrats optimistic as social spending bill heads to Senate MORE and domestic policy adviser Susan RiceSusan RiceAn unquestioning press promotes Rep. Adam Schiff's book based on Russia fiction Biden administration, stakeholders to host interagency event on economic equity Black Caucus pushes for priorities in final deal MORE, met for hours on Capitol Hill with congressional leaders and their staff. They also met with Sens. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinTrump haunts Biden vaccine mandate in courts IRS data proves Trump tax cuts benefited middle, working-class Americans most Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by ExxonMobil — Dems press drillers over methane leaks MORE (D-W.Va.) and Kyrsten SinemaKyrsten SinemaIRS data proves Trump tax cuts benefited middle, working-class Americans most Photos of the Week: Schumer, ASU protest and sea turtles Green groups spend big to promote climate policy MORE (D-Ariz.), who are the main stumbling blocks to ensuring a reconciliation bill makes it through the Senate.

But Manchin emerged late Thursday evening and declared there was no deal and that it would take at least another day. The senator earlier in the day said he would not be comfortable with the reconciliation bill costing more than $1.5 trillion, something Sinema has backed.

A notice from House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerSenate leaders face pushback on tying debt fight to defense bill Overnight Defense & National Security — US tries to deter Russian invasion of Ukraine Senate eyes plan B amid defense bill standoff MORE's (D-Md.) office issued shortly before 11 p.m. Thursday confirmed that there would be no further votes for the night. The House is expected to reconvene Friday morning as the negotiations continue. 

President BidenJoe BidenChina eyes military base on Africa's Atlantic coast: report Biden orders flags be flown at half-staff through Dec. 9 to honor Dole Biden heading to Kansas City to promote infrastructure package MORE was not seen or heard from all day Thursday, though White House officials said he was making calls to lawmakers to urge support for his agenda. He has devoted much of his time in recent weeks to wooing Manchin and Sinema in a bid to get them on board with the larger reconciliation bill.