Biden honors fallen police: Being a cop today 'harder than it has ever been'

Biden honors fallen police: Being a cop today 'harder than it has ever been'
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President BidenJoe BidenBiden to provide update Monday on US response to omicron variant Restless progressives eye 2024 Emhoff lights first candle in National Menorah-lighting ceremony MORE on Saturday honored police during a speech outside the Capitol to honor officers who died in the line of duty in 2019 and 2020.

Biden said it had been a historically difficult period for police, arguing that the wider public didn’t understand the difficulties and that the country would have a harder time finding people to be officers as a result.

“I’ve been coming to this memorial for 40 years, missed a couple, and I’ve spoken to too many police memorials around the country, and it always amazes me how the public doesn’t fully understand what we expect of our law enforcement officers,” Biden said at the 40th annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service.

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Biden said being a police officer today “is a lot harder than it has ever been.”

“We expect you to be people ready to stand in the way and take a bullet for us. We expect you to be able to track down the bad guys. We expect you to be able to be the psychologist who talks the couple that are having a violent confrontation together to step back,” he said. “We expect you to be everything. We expect everything of you, and it’s beyond the capacity of anyone to meet the tall expectations.”

“We’re waking up to the notion that unless we can change the environment in which the job can be done, we’re going to have trouble having enough women and men come forward who want to do the job,” said Biden, who ordered flags to be flown at half-staff in recognition of Saturday’s event.

He also commented on the shootings early Saturday of three officers who had been working security jobs at a Houston bar when they came under fire in what police there described as an ambush attack and on the police who defended the Capitol when a mob overwhelmed U.S. Capitol Police and invaded the building on Jan. 6.

Biden did not mention the controversies that have consumed discussions about police, particularly since the killing by police in Minneapolis of George Floyd, which led to a murder conviction for one officer in that city this year.

The White House has backed efforts in Congress to pass police reform legislation, though those talks ended earlier this year over differences between GOP and Democratic negotiators.

Biden mentioned various policies he’s backed for gun control during the event, including “red flag” laws that would allow authorities or family members to remove guns from people who could represent a danger to themselves or others.

He also noted that he has called on Congress to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act. Forty percent of all calls that result in an officer’s death were domestic violence related, Biden said.

Biden also noted that COVID-19 has caused more deaths for police in the line of duty than all other causes combined.

Police unions in some cities have argued against vaccine mandates despite the deaths of officers from COVID-19.