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Obama 'amused' by Tea Party rallies

President Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaGOP group makes late play in Iowa seat once seen as lost Chance the Rapper works as Lyft driver to raise money for Chicago schools Americans are safer from terrorism, but new threats are arising MORE struck a hyperpartisan note Thursday, telling Democrats that he was "amused" by the Tax Day Tea Party rallies.

Obama, addressing a Democratic National Committee (DNC) fundraiser in Miami, did little to endear himself to the Tea Party groups protesting around the country, saying "they should be saying thank you" because of the tax cuts he has signed into law.

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The president went as far as to say that this week's special election in Florida, which was won by Democrat Ted Deutch, was portrayed by Republicans as "a referendum on healthcare, a referendum on the stimulus."

"And you know what, it was," Obama said to applause.

Obama continued to dare Republicans to run on a platform of repealing healthcare reform, telling the audience "they won't be very successful."

Despite the president's confidence, DNC Chairman Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Trump says 'rogue killers' could be behind missing journalist | Sends Pompeo to meet Saudi king | Saudis may claim Khashoggi killed by accident | Ex-VA chief talks White House 'chaos' | Most F-35s cleared for flight Democrats torch Trump for floating 'rogue killers' to blame for missing journalist Election Countdown: O'Rourke brings in massive M haul | Deal on judges lets senators return to the trail | Hurricane puts Florida candidates in the spotlight | Adelson spending big to save GOP in midterms MORE told the crowd that they should assume that Democrats are "running into a headwind" in the November midterms.

Kaine said Democrats, who gathered at one of two fundraisers that raised about $2.5 million for the party, are the underdogs this year.

"You don't mind being the underdog, you don't mind running into a headwind, you don't mind an uphill race," Kaine said. "You don't mind being the underdog. Becasue that's what Democrats do. We are the underdogs."

Obama also continued to try to make the case that a vote against financial regulatory reform is a vote on behalf of Wall Street and against Main Street.

"Every member of Congress is soon going to have to make a decision, but the choice is going to be very simple between special interests and the American people," Obama said.

The president was returning to Washington on Thursday night.