Majority of Floridians opposed to Trump reelection: poll

Majority of Floridians opposed to Trump reelection: poll
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A majority of Florida voters surveyed in a poll released early Wednesday said they do not believe President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump defends Stephanopolous interview Trump defends Stephanopolous interview Buttigieg on offers of foreign intel: 'Just call the FBI' MORE should be reelected in 2020.

Politico reported that a Bendixen & Amandi International poll showed 40 percent of registered Florida voters said they think Trump should be reelected, while 53 did not support a second term.

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Among Republicans, 72 percent of respondents said Trump should get another term, and 23 percent said he should not. Democratic responses were flipped, with 73 percent opposing a second term and 14 percent supporting one.

The numbers are potentially concerning for Trump, given Florida's status as a key swing state. The candidate who has won Florida has gone on to win the presidency each of the last six elections.

Wednesday's poll found Trump's approval rating in Florida is consistent with his national approval rating. Forty-three percent of those surveyed said they have a favorable view of the president, compared to 52 percent who have an unfavorable view.

The poll surveyed 602 registered Florida voters from March 1 to 4 and has a margin of error of 4 percentage points.

Trump narrowly won Florida in the 2016 election, topping Democratic nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHouse Intel Republican: 'Foolish' not to take info on opponent from foreign ally House Intel Republican: 'Foolish' not to take info on opponent from foreign ally It's about the delegates, stupid MORE by roughly 120,000 votes. He returned to the state multiple times during the 2018 midterm cycle to boost now-Gov. Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisDeSantis signs bill banning sanctuary cities DeSantis signs bill banning sanctuary cities DeSantis reissues Pulse proclamation after backlash for not referencing LGBT community MORE (R) and now-Sen. Rick Scott's (R) campaigns.