Sanders tops survey of young voters that shows Buttigieg trailing

Sanders tops survey of young voters that shows Buttigieg trailing

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersGloves come off as Democrats fight for House seat in California Senate Democrats pump brakes on new stimulus checks The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Unemployment claims now at 41 million with 2.1 million more added to rolls; Topeka mayor says cities don't have enough tests for minorities and homeless communities MORE (I-Vt.) is the top choice of younger voters among the candidates in the 2020 Democratic presidential field, according to a new poll that shows former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegBiden hopes to pick VP by Aug. 1 It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Here's how Biden can win over the minority vote and the Rust Belt MORE tied for last place.

Sanders was the preferred candidate for 32 percent of respondents in the Forbes-Zogby poll of voters between the ages of 18 and 29. Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden campaign cancels fundraiser with Mueller prosecutor Twitter joins Democrats to boost mail-in voting — here's why The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - George Floyd's death sparks protests, National Guard activation MORE follows with 16 percent, and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenCOVID-19 workplace complaints surge; unions rip administration Gloves come off as Democrats fight for House seat in California Police killing in Minneapolis puts new scrutiny on Biden pick MORE (D-Mass.) and former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg were tied for third with 9 percent.

Entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangIt's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process Hillicon Valley: Facebook permanently shifting thousands of jobs to remote work | Congressional action on driverless cars hits speed bump during pandemic | Republicans grill TikTok over data privacy concerns The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Mnuchin sees 'strong likelihood' of another relief package; Warner says some businesses 'may not come back' at The Hill's Advancing America's Economy summit MORE came in at 8 percent, with Buttigieg, Sen. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharPolice killing in Minneapolis puts new scrutiny on Biden pick Cortez Masto says she's not interested in being Biden VP Voting rights, public health officials roll out guidelines to protect voters from COVID-19 MORE (D-Minn.) and Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard drops defamation lawsuit against Clinton It's as if a Trump operative infiltrated the Democratic primary process 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic MORE (D-Hawaii) tied at 3 percent. Thirteen percent of respondents said they were undecided.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sanders, 78, is the oldest candidate in the Democratic field. If elected, the 38-year-old Buttigieg would be the youngest and first openly gay U.S. president.

Sanders’s lead in the survey cuts across demographics, including young men, women, whites, African Americans and Latinos as well as self-described Democrats, independents, progressives and liberals.

Survey respondents also prefer every leading Democratic candidate to President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinneapolis erupts for third night, as protests spread, Trump vows retaliation Stocks open mixed ahead of Trump briefing on China The island that can save America MORE by double digits, with Sanders beating him 58 percent to 34 percent. Biden tops Trump 51 percent to 35 percent, and Warren leads the president 51 percent to 36 percent, according to the poll. Bloomberg also leads Trump in a head-to-head match-up, 50 percent to 34 percent, while Buttigieg has a 12-point margin, 47 percent to 35 percent.

“We know from history that the young vote, when harnessed and unleashed, can have huge consequences on the election,” Jeremy Zogby, partner and managing director of John Zogby Strategies, said in a statement. “The Young Voter survey we’re conducting with Forbes is an important barometer of what will happen not only this year but in five- to 10 years, as this young cohort becomes the next wave of leaders in business and society.”

Pollsters surveyed 1,014 adults aged 18-29, including 650 likely Democratic caucus voters, on Jan. 19 and 20.