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Poll: Biden neck and neck with Trump in Florida, Arizona

Democratic nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE is leading President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE in the battleground states of Florida and Arizona, according to a new Reuters-Ipsos poll released Wednesday. 

The survey found the former vice president 4 points ahead in Florida, with Biden garnering 49 percent support and Trump with 45 percent. Biden leads Trump by two points ahead Arizona, registering 48 percent support ahead of Trump's 46 percent support.

Both of Biden's leads in the states are within the survey's margin of error. 

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In 2016, Trump won Florida and Arizona by slim margins, with Trump winning the Sunshine State by 1.2 points over former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden to name longtime aide Blinken as secretary of State: report Understanding mixed results in Pennsylvania key to future elections What's behind the divisions over Biden's secretary of Labor? MORE. Trump won Arizona by 3.6 points over Clinton.

Should Biden win Arizona in November, he would be the first Democrat to do so since former President Clinton in 1996. 

According to the Reuters poll, 50 percent of Florida participants said Biden would be better at handling the coronavirus, compared to 41 percent who said the same of Trump. 

With regard to COVID-19, Arizona 49 percent of likely voters said that Biden would be better suited to handle the outbreak, with 43 percent saying the same of Trump.

The poll comes just six days after the president was diagnosed with COVID-19. He and other top Republicans have contracted the disease including former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, top White House aide Hope HicksHope Charlotte HicksWomen set to take key roles in Biden administration President says Trump Jr. doing 'very well' after COVID-19 diagnosis Donald Trump Jr. tests positive for COVID-19 MORE and former White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayWomen set to take key roles in Biden administration Lara Trump mulling 2022 Senate run in North Carolina: report Press: Where is Jim Baker when we need him? MORE

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Trump ended coronavirus relief talks Tuesday night, claiming that Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiUS economy hurtles toward 'COVID cliff' with programs set to expire Democrats gear up for last oversight showdown with Trump Divided citizenry and government — a call to action for common ground MORE (D-Calif.) and Democrats were not negotiating on a stimulus package in "good faith." The president later appeared to back track somewhat Wednesday, urging Congress to pass smaller stand-alone bills.  

A recent Quinnipiac University poll released Wednesday showed Biden leading by 11 points in Florida with more than 50 percent of the vote.

A Rasmussen poll released Wednesday showed Biden leading Trump by 12 points nationally.

The show of support for Biden comes after a chaotic debate between the president and Biden last Tuesday. During the event in Ohio, moderator and Fox News anchor Chris WallaceChristopher (Chris) WallaceBiden adviser: 'He does not have any concern' about Trump lawsuits Public health expert: Americans no longer acting 'with common purpose' on pandemic Anti-Defamation League criticizes White House appointee 'who has consorted with racists' MORE struggled to keep the conversation on track and was subjected to numerous interruptions, many of them from Trump himself.

The Reuters-Ipsos opinion polls were conducted online in both Arizona and Florida in English, as well as Spanish.

The Florida survey was conducted from Sept. 29 to Oct. 6, gathering responses from 1,100 adults, including 678 likely voters, and had a credibility interval of 4 percentage points. 

The Arizona poll was conducted from Sept. 29 to Oct. 7, gathering responses from 1,099 adults, including 663 likely voters, and had a credibility interval of 4 percentage points.