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Cunningham, Tillis locked in tight race in North Carolina: poll

Cunningham, Tillis locked in tight race in North Carolina: poll

Sen. Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisTeam Trump offering 'fire hose' of conspiracy Kool-Aid for supporters Loeffler isolating after possible COVID-19 infection North Carolina's Mark Walker expected to announce Senate bid MORE (R) and Democratic challenger Cal Cunningham are running neck-and-neck in North Carolina's Senate race, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll released Tuesday. 

Cunningham leads incumbent Tillis by only 2 points, with Cunningham garnering 49 percent support from likely voters and Tillis garnering 47 percent support.

The difference between the two candidates in the survey falls within its 4.5-point margin of error.

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About a quarter of likely voters felt that the recent news of Cunningham’s affair was important to their decision. Cunningham, a lieutenant colonel in the Army Reserve, admitted to having an affair and requested privacy regarding what he called a personal matter. 

News of his affair did not appear to significantly affect his campaign, as he has maintained a lead ahead of Tillis since the news broke. Tillis and other Republican groups have seized on the affair, stressing that Cunningham has put the importance of duty and character at the center of his campaign. 

Eighty-one percent of those surveyed said that control of the Senate by either the Democratic or Republican party was important to their vote.

The GOP grip on the majority is in jeopardy this election cycle as vulnerable Republicans like Tillis and Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTeam Trump offering 'fire hose' of conspiracy Kool-Aid for supporters Democrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks Hogan 'embarrassed that more people' in the GOP 'aren't speaking up' against Trump MORE (Maine), Cory GardnerCory GardnerHillicon Valley: Trump fires top federal cybersecurity official, GOP senators push back | Apple to pay 3 million to resolve fight over batteries | Los Angeles Police ban use of third-party facial recognition software Senate passes bill to secure internet-connected devices against cyber vulnerabilities Democrats vent to Schumer over Senate majority failure MORE (Colo.), Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyTrump nominee's long road to Fed may be dead end McSally, staff asked to break up maskless photo op inside Capitol McSally's final floor speech: 'I gave it my all, and I left it all on the field' MORE (Ariz.) and even Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMedia and Hollywood should stop their marching-to-Georgia talk Hackers love a bad transition The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump campaign files for Wis. recount l Secretaries of state fume at Trump allegations l Biden angered over transition delay MORE (S.C.) are running tight races with just weeks to go until the general election. 

Democrats need to flip three or four Senate seats to gain the majority in the upper chamber, depending on which party wins the White House. 

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTop aide: Biden expected to visit Georgia in push to boost Ossoff, Warnock Democrats brush off calls for Biden to play hardball on Cabinet picks Richmond says GOP 'reluctant to stand up and tell the emperor he wears no clothes' MORE (R-Ky.) is currently attempting to secure two wins for the GOP, passing a second coronavirus aid bill and confirming Judge Amy Coney BarrettAmy Coney BarrettAlito to far-right litigants: The buffet is open Hispanics shock Democrats in deep blue California COVID-19: Justice Alito overstepped judicial boundaries MORE to the Supreme Court seat left vacant by the late Justice Ruth Bader GinsburgRuth Bader GinsburgCOVID-19: Justice Alito overstepped judicial boundaries Defusing the judicial confirmation process Conservative justices help save ObamaCare — for now MORE. The efforts are an attempt to bolster vulnerable GOP incumbents in their races this November. 

In the same Washington Post-ABC News Poll, 50 percent of likely North Carolina voters said they support Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE and 48 percent said they support President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden to nominate Linda Thomas-Greenfield for UN ambassador: reports Scranton dedicates 'Joe Biden Way' to honor president-elect Kasich: Republicans 'either in complete lockstep' or 'afraid' of Trump MORE.

The poll interviewed 795 adults in North Carolina from Oct. 12 to 17.