Republican wave bigger than 1994

Republican wave bigger than 1994

Republicans have swept control of House seats across the country, handing them control of the lower chamber.

The GOP have won 63 Democratic-held seats while Democrats picked up three GOP seats, which gives the Republicans a net gain of 60 seats so far.

The wave is bigger than the massive gains Republicans made in 1994, when the party picked up 52 seats. And Democrats have lost power in the lower chamber after only four years in the majority.

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In one of the biggest loses for Democrats, House Budget Committee Chairman John Spratt (D-S.C.) lost in a tough relection bid. He was a heavy GOP target and criticized for his ties to the Speaker and his votes for cap-and-trade, the stimulus and healthcare reform.

Armed Services Committee Chairman Ike Skelton (D-Mo.), a 17-term incumbent, lost to Republican Vicky Hartzler.

Early Wednesday morning a third committee chairman lost his bid for releection. Rep. James Oberstar (D-Minn.), an 18-term incumbent and the chairman of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, lost to Republican Chip Cravaack.

In Mississippi, Blue Dog Rep. Gene Taylor (D), the Democrat who declared he voted for John McCainJohn Sidney McCainVeterans group to hand out USS John McCain T-shirts for July 4 on the National Mall Will we ever have another veteran as president? Meghan McCain clashes with Joy Behar as the 'sacrificial Republican' on 'The View' MORE for president and wouldn't support Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) for speaker, lost. Republican Steven Palazzo will represent the district.

In Alabama, Rep. Bobby Bright (D), who was the first Dem to say he wouldn't vote for Pelosi for speaker and also joked she might "get sick and die," lost to Republican Martha RobyMartha Dubina RobyThe Go-Go's rock the stage at annual 'We Write the Songs' DC concert The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - Restrictive state abortion laws ignite fiery 2020 debate Thirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill MORE.

In Wisconsin, Republicans won retiring Rep. David Obey's (D-Wis.) seat. Obey is the powerful chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. Republican Sean DuffySean Patrick DuffyFox News contributor Campos-Duffy compares abortion to slavery Carson on HUD eviction plan: 'You take care of your own first' Sean Duffy, Rachel Campos-Duffy expecting their ninth child MORE, a former contestant on MTV's "Real World," will represent the district. Also, sophomore Rep. Steve Kagen (D) lost his reelection bid to Republican Reid RibbleReid James RibbleSetting the record straight about No Labels With Trump, conservatives hope for ally in 'War on Christmas' GOP rushes to embrace Trump MORE.

In North Dakota, Rep. Earl Pomeroy (D) lost to Republican Rick Berg. Pomeroy was a top GOP target and each party spent over a $1 million to try to win this seat. And, in South Dakota, Rep. Stephanie Herseth Sandlin (D) lost to Republican Kristi Noem. Herseth Sandlin, who voted against healthcare reform, became a top GOP target and Noem proved herself to be a prolific fundraiser.

In New Mexico, former Rep. Steve Pearce (R) won his seat back over from freshman Rep. Harry Teague (D).

In Pennsylvania, freshman Rep. Kathy Dahlkemper (D) lost to Republican Mike Kelly. Rep. Patrick Murphy (D-Pa.), who led the charge in the House to change the Pentagon's "Don't ask, don't tell" policy, lost to former Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R-Pa.). And 13-term Rep. Paul Kanjorski (D) lost to Republican Lou BarlettaLouis (Lou) James BarlettaTrump's most memorable insults and nicknames of 2018 GOP trading fancy offices, nice views for life in minority Casey secures third Senate term over Trump-backed Barletta MORE. Barletta had challenged Kanjorski twice before and lost.

In Ohio, Rep. Zack Space (D) lost to Republican Bob Gibbs. Space infuriated unions when he voted against the healthcare bill. Union support was divided because of his vote. The AFL-CIO campaigned for him but the Service Employees International Union told their members to not vote for him. Rep. Mary Jo Kilroy (D) lost a tough reelection battle to Steve Stivers, who she beat last cycle. And freshman Rep. Steve Driehaus (D) lost to Republican Steve Chabot. Driehaus defeated Chabot in a close race last cycle. GOP leader John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerTed Cruz, AOC have it right on banning former members of Congress from becoming lobbyists Rep. Amash stokes talk of campaign against Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Trump, Biden go toe-to-toe in Iowa MORE (R-Ohio) called Driehaus a "dead man" after Driehaus voted for healthcare reform.

In North Carolina, Rep. Bob Etheridge (D), who gained national attention after a video confrontation with two college students went viral, lost.

In Texas, 10-term Rep. Chet Edwards (D), a perennial GOP target, lost to Republican Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresOvernight Energy: GOP lawmaker parodies Green New Deal in new bill | House Republicans accuse Dems of ramming through climate bill | Park Service chief grilled over shutdown House Republicans accuse Dems of ramming through climate bill Seven Republicans vote against naming post office after ex-Rep. Louise Slaughter MORE. Edwards was discussed as a vice presidential candidate in 2008. His district houses former President George W. Bush's Crawford ranch. And six-term Rep. Ciro Rodriguez (D) lost to Republican Francisco “Quico” Canseco. Rodriquez had been a GOP target for years and, in Canseco, the party had a well-funded Latino candidate for the Hispanic-heavy district.

In Idaho, freshman Rep. Walter Minnick (D-Idaho) lost. Minnick represented one of the most Republican-leaning districts in the country but had the conservative voting record to match: he voted against cap-and-trade legislation, the stimulus and the healthcare bill. But he fell to Republican Raul Labrador.

Other Democrats who have lost their reelection bid include Reps. Dina Titus (Nev.), John Salazar (Colo.), Harry Mitchell (Ariz.), Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickDemocrats face voters clamoring for impeachment Arizona Dems ask DHS to appoint 'crisis coordinator' at border Democrats introduce bill to let 'Dreamers' work for Congress MORE (Ariz.), Mike McMahon (N.Y.), Scott Murphy (N.Y.), Ron Klein (Fla.), Mark Schauer (Mich.), Betsy Markey (Colo.), John Hall (N.Y.), Michael Arcuri (N.Y.), John Adler (D-N.J.), Bill FosterGeorge (Bill) William FosterNew bill would restrict Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from lobbying Pelosi joins other Dem leaders in support of Chicago Symphony Orchestra strikers This week: Shutdown showdown looms over new Congress MORE (Ill.), Debbie Halvorson (Ill.), Phil Hare (D-Ill.), John Boccieri (Ohio), Frank Kratovil (Md.), Chris Carney (Pa.), Charlie Wilson (Ohio) and Travis Childers (Miss.).

Republicans also won former Rep. Eric Massa's (D-N.Y.) seat. Massa resigned after allegations he acted inappropriately with his congressional staff.

In New Hampshire, Rep. Carol Shea-Porter (D-N.H.), a two-term lawmaker, lost to Republican Frank Guinta. And former Rep. Charlie Bass (R) won his old seat over liberal favorite Ann Kuster. Bass lost his seat to Paul Hodes (D), who ran for Senate this cycle and lost.

Five-term Rep. Baron Hill (D-Ind.) was defeated by Republican Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungOvernight Defense: Officials brief Congress after Iran shoots down drone | Lawmakers fear 'grave situation' | Trump warns Iran | Senate votes to block Saudi arms sales | Bombshell confession at Navy SEAL's murder trial The 7 GOP senators who voted to block all or part of Trump's Saudi arms sale Senate votes to block Trump's Saudi arms sale MORE. Rep. Jim Marshall (D-Ga.), who is in his fourth term, also lost.



Republicans also won retiring Reps. Bart Stupak's (D-Mich.), Dennis Moore's (D-Kan.), Marion Berry's (D-Ark.), Vic Snyder's (D-Ark.), and Brian Baird's (Wash.) seats as well as Rep. Charlie Melancon's (D-La.) seat. Melancon launched an unsuccessful bid for the Senate. They also won Rep. Joe Sestak's (D-Pa.) seat. Sestak lost a Senate race Tuesday. 

The GOP took over ousted Rep. Alan Mollohan's (D-W.V.) seat. Mollohan lost to Mike Oliverio in the May Democratic primary but Oliverio lost to Republican David McKinleyDavid Bennett McKinleyBipartisan former EPA chiefs say Trump administration has abandoned agency's mission Thirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill Divisions emerge over House drug price bills MORE on election night.

In Florida, seven-term Rep. Allen Boyd (D-Fla.) lost to Republican Steve Southerland. Boyd was a top GOP target this cycle. Sandy Adams defeated freshman Rep. Suzanne Kosmas (D-Fla.) and Republican Daniel Webster defeated freshman Rep. Alan GraysonAlan Mark GraysonFlorida's Darren Soto fends off Dem challenge from Alan Grayson Live results: Arizona and Florida hold primaries The Hill's Morning Report: Frustration mounts as Republicans blow up tax message MORE (D-Fla.), who attracted national attention when he said on the House floor that Republicans want people to die quickly.

And in Virginia, Democratic Reps. Rick Boucher, Tom Perriello, and Glenn Nye lost. Boucher's loss was a major setback for Democrats. He is serving his 14th term and is a subcommittee chairman on the Energy and Commerce Committee.

In Indiana, Republican Larry Bucshoon defeated Democrat Trent Van Haaften to win Rep. Brad Ellsworth's (D-Ind.) seat. Ellsworth ran for the Senate and lost.

In Tennessee, four-term Rep. Lincoln Davis (D) lost to Republican Scott DesJarlias. And Republicans picked up retiring Rep. Bart Gordon's (D-Tenn.) seat. Republican Diane BlackDiane Lynn BlackBottom line Overnight Health Care: Anti-abortion Democrats take heat from party | More states sue Purdue over opioid epidemic | 1 in 4 in poll say high costs led them to skip medical care Lamar Alexander's exit marks end of an era in evolving Tennessee MORE defeated Democrat Brett Carter.  Republicans also won retiring Rep. John Tanner's (D-Tenn.). Republican Stephen FincherStephen Lee FincherLamar Alexander's exit marks end of an era in evolving Tennessee Tensions on immigration erupt in the House GOP Trump backs Blackburn's Tennessee Senate bid MORE will now represent the district.

Not all the news is bad for Democrats. As expected, Democrat John Carney picked up Rep. Mike Castle's seat (R-Del.) and Democrats also captured Rep. Joseph Cao (R-La.). President Obama won Cao's district in 2008 by a three-to-one margin over Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.).

Castle ran for the Senate but lost in the GOP primary to Christine O'Donnell.

And Democrats recaptured Hawaii's first congressional district, which is Obama's home district. Democrat Colleen Hanabusa defeated Rep. Charles Djou (R-Hawaii). Djou took the seat in a special election after Rep. Neil Abercrombie (D) resigned to run for governor.

Also, the AP withdrew its call in Georgia's second congressional district. Earlier in the evening, the AP reported nine-term Rep. Sanford Bishop (D) had lost to Republican Mike Keown but, with additional votes counted, Bishop holds a slim lead.



— Russell Berman, Michael O’Brien, Kevin Bogardus, Bob Cusack, Shane D'Aprile, and Mike Lillis contributed to this article.   

-- This story was originally posted at 8:32 p.m. and last updated at 11:59 p.m. and 4:56 a.m.